Articles for category DBG


Johanna Wiedener (University Leipzig)

Schematic illustration of a mixed species approach of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Syn6803) and a heterotrophic aerobic bacterium to remove oxygen from the reaction to enable hydrogen production by the cyanobacterium (top) and co-cultivation as a biofilm in a capillary reactor (bottom). Graphic and photo: Johanna Wiedener

Johanna Wiedener's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Leipzig University in the year 2020.

Title: Investigation of a mixed species cultivation concept for a continuous photosynthesis-driven hydrogen production

A mixed species cultivation using a photosynthetic cyanobacterium and an oxygen consuming heterotrophic bacterium enables light-driven and continuous hydrogen production from water.

Hydrogen is considered as the energy carrier of the future. In addition to a technical generation of hydrogen by electrolysis of water using renewable energies (solar/wind power), biological approaches are also possible. Promising are cyanobacteria, which also can split water by the means of light to ‘’win’’ electrons for biosynthesis. This process is known as oxygenic photosynthesis. In cyanobacteria the electrons obtained from water splitting can alternatively "flow" into the enzymatic synthesis of hydrogen.

The present work deals with the light-driven hydrogen production of the model strain Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 – particularly to the dilemma that the hydrogenases necessary for hydrogen production, obtain electrons from photosynthesis but are at the same time inactivated by the oxygen also generated during photosynthesis. In this master thesis, the milieu was kept anaerobic for the first time by co-cultivating Synechocystis with a heterotrophic bacterium. Thereby a hydrogen synthesis was achieved that could be measured over several hours. It could be proven that the electrons for hydrogen synthesis indeed originate from photosynthetic water splitting. Furthermore, the observations could also be transferred to an alternative cultivation concept: a bacterial biofilm. 'Multi-species' biofilms represent the natural lifestyle of microorganisms and offer the advantage of improved tolerance to unfavorable environmental conditions. From a technical point of view, they allow a long-term, stable cultivation of microorganisms. If sufficient nutrient sources are present, they can generate all their needed elements by themselves and are also able of self-regeneration. In biofilms a significant hydrogen production was documented even after several weeks. It was proven that it is in fact the cyanobacterial partner that produces this hydrogen. Although many problems still need to be solved, this work has taken the biological approach of hydrogen production a significant step towards application.

___

Johanna Wiedener conducted this work at the Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) Leipzig in the department Solar Materials of Prof. Andreas Schmid under supervision of PD Dr. Stephan Klähn.

04 Dec 2020

51st DBG Newsletter

Three information pieces are provided in English

  • Where you find help in understanding and executing the regulations of the Nagoya Protocol
  • Call for conference organisation
  • Call for Papers

All other informations in German only

Warum Laubbäume im Klimawandel weniger CO2 binden könnten, als erhofft, wie viele tausende von Arten neu zur Liste der Gefäßpflanzen hinzukamen und wer je mehrere Millionen Euro für die Pflanzenforschung erhält, sind Themen dieser Ausgabe.

Die DBG bedauert, eine Verschiebung der Botanikertagung bekannt geben zu müssen. Sie kann sich jedoch freuen, dass an mehreren Universitäten bereits die ersten Preise für herausragende Master-Arbeiten des Jahres 2020 überreicht werden konnten. Die Sektionen Pflanzenphysiologie und Molekularbiologie hat die Registrierung zur Tagung vor kurzem geöffnet und auch andere Sektionen haben Neues zu berichten. Wir geben darüber hinaus Hinweise, wo Sie Hilfe zur Umsetzung des Nagoya-Protokolls erhalten. Der erste Erfahrungsbericht über eine virtuelle Konferenz, ein call for conference organisation, und ein call for papers haben uns ebenfalls erreicht.

to DBG-Newsletter (pdf file)

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04 Dec 2020

51st Newsletter

Three information pieces are provided in English

  • Where you find help in understanding and executing the regulations of the Nagoya Protocol
  • Call for conference organisation
  • Call for Papers

All other informations in German

Warum Laubbäume im Klimawandel weniger CO2 binden könnten, als erhofft, wie viele tausende von Arten neu zur Liste der Gefäßpflanzen hinzukamen und wer je mehrere Millionen Euro für die Pflanzenforschung erhält, sind Themen dieser Ausgabe.

Die DBG bedauert, eine Verschiebung der Botanikertagung bekannt geben zu müssen. Sie kann sich jedoch freuen, dass an mehreren Universitäten bereits die ersten Preise für herausragende Master-Arbeiten des Jahres 2020 überreicht werden konnten. Die Sektionen Pflanzenphysiologie und Molekularbiologie hat die Registrierung zur Tagung vor kurzem geöffnet und auch andere Sektionen haben Neues zu berichten. Wir geben darüber hinaus Hinweise, wo Sie Hilfe zur Umsetzung des Nagoya-Protokolls erhalten. Der erste Erfahrungsbericht über eine virtuelle Konferenz, ein call for conference organisation, und ein call for papers haben uns ebenfalls erreicht.

to 51st Newsletter (please log-in first)

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Mara Schultz (Rostock University)

Due to the current travel restrictions, Mara Schultz received her deed not from Prof Birgit Piechulla at Rostock University, but from DBG's president, Prof Andreas Weber, at Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Schultz's new working place. Photo: private

Mara Schultz's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Rostock University in the year 2020.

Title: The role of the small protein HliR1 in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 during high light stress

Schultz characterized the physiological role of the recently annotated small protein HliR1 and detected its participation in the high light stress response in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

The small protein HliR1 was newly annotated by Baumgartner et al. (BMC Microbiol 28:2016) in the genome of Synechocystis, where hlir1 is located in front of the gene for superoxide dismutase (SOD). SOD is involved in the removal of reactive oxygen species in the cell, which occur in particular in the case of strong light stress.

To analyze the physiological role of HliR1 in Synechocystis, several mutants were available in which the protein-coding or RNA-coding part of hliR1 was deleted. Furthermore, a strain in which HliR1 was expressed in the mutant was examined. Schultz characterized these strains phenotypically, biochemically and molecular biologically with regard to growth under different conditions. In addition, I aimed to detect interactions of HliR1 with other proteins.

The physiological investigations showed that HliR1 plays an important role during high light stress. The mutant with the protein-coding sequence deleted could not grow in strong light, while the expression of hliR1 in this mutant abolished the phenotype. However, neither changes in the SOD activity nor an HliR1-SOD interaction could be detected that would have explained this phenotype. Investigation of protein-protein interactions suggests that HliR1 may interact with various proteins involved in building and repairing photosystem II. This finding suggests that HliR1 may play a role in the repair of photosystem II under high light stress.

___

Mara Schultz conducted this work at the Institute for life sciences in the working group of Prof. Dr. Martin Hagemann.

2020

In the year 2020 DBG's representatives at the universities evaluated master theses in plant sciences. The following persons received the award (in alphabetical order):

Claudia Banse (Humboldt Universität Berlin)
Hämbindung an der GBP sorgt für Feedback-Regulation in der Tetrapyrrolsynthese

Susanne Elisabeth Bleser (Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz)
Characteristics of CAM-photosynthesis and anatomic-physiological features of leaves in Aeonium (Crassulaceae)

Nicole Graumann (Universität Bielefeld)
Gene editing mittels CRISPR/Cas9-vermittelter Mutagenese in der Grünalge Volvox carteri

Levke Valena Höche (Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel)
The combined effects of population origin and inbreeding on plant traits attracting pollinating insects
more in the -> summary with images

Lara Höpfner (Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster)
Function of protein N-glycosylation in flagella mediated cell gliding
more in the -> summary and image

Johanna Knab (Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, FAU)
Analysis of CNGCs in Physcomitrium patens and generation of optogenetic lines and a pH marker for live-cell imaging
more in the -> summary with image

Joelle Kröll (Universität Innsbruck)
Allopolyploidy, introgression and morphological differentiation in the Pyrenean endemic Saxifraga pubescens
more in the -> summary with images

Elena Lesch (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn)
Evolution of moss RNA editing factors and their functions tested in a variety of model systems

Fabian Munder (Universität Hamburg)
Elucidating the Mechanism of Protein Translocation into Peroxisomes: Biophysical, Structural and in vivo Characterization of two Peroxisomal Biogenesis Proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana

Mara Schultz (Universität Rostock)
Die Rolle des Proteins HliR1 in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 bei der Stressantwort bei Starklichtverhältnissen
more in the -> summary with image

Nora Stingl (Philipps Universität Marburg)
Successful cultivation of the new model organisms Chara braunii, Spirogyra pratensis and Mougeotia scalaris in the lab and discovery of different growth behavior of various Anthoceros agrestis strains
more in the -> summary

Johanna Wiedener (Universität Leipzig)
Investigation of a mixed species cultivation concept for a continuous photosynthesis-driven hydrogen production
more in the -> summary with two images

Lara Hoepfner (Münster University)

Flagella mediated adhesion of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to a solid surface. Taking advantage of TIRF microscopy both dynamics can be imaged and analyzed (down). Graphic: Lara Hoepfner

Lara Hoepfner's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster in the year 2020.

Title: Function of protein N-glycosylation in flagella mediated cell gliding

Altered N-glycan maturation of flagella membrane proteins impacts adhesion to solid surfaces however does not impede the cells gliding ability.

The biflagellate Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a well-known model organism in research on cilia and flagella. Via their two flagella, cells are able to adhere to and glide along solid surfaces thanks to N-glycosylated membrane proteins such as flagella membrane glycoprotein FMG1-B.

Taking advantage of mass spectrometry and TIRF microscopy mutants with altered N-glycosylation were analyzed regarding changes in their flagella proteome as well as their ability to adhere and glide. Further the particular role of FMG1-B in respective dynamics was examined by characterization of two FMG1-B knock down mutants.

Altered N-glycosylation decreases the adhesion force of flagella to a surface, however, this has no impact on flagella protein targeting or the ability to glide. Further it could be shown that FMG1-B is not the only N-glycosylated protein involved in flagella membrane adhesion and gliding in contrast to the current model.

In future further N-glycosylation mutants will be analyzed regarding their ability to adhere and glide and the role of further candidate proteins involved in adhesion and gliding besides or instead of FMG1-B will be analyzed.

___

Lara Hoepfner conducted this work at the institute for plant biochemistry and biotechnology in the working group of Prof. Dr. Michael Hippler.

Johanna Knab (Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg)

Confocal optical sections through a Physcomitrium patens protonemal cell accumulating a ChR-2-XXL-GFP fusion protein in the plasma membrane (green). Chloroplasts display red autofluorescence. Scale bar: 15 μm. Image: Johanna Knab

Johanna Knab's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) in the year 2020.

Title: Analysis of CNGCs in Physcomitrium patens and generation of optogenetic lines and a pH marker for live-cell imaging

Local Ca2+-import trough CNGC channels appears to modulate tip growth in moss (Physcomitrium patens) protonemata and can be investigated using a newly established optogenetic system.

In plants, "cyclic nucleotide-gated channels" (CNGCs) regulate numerous biological processes ranging from development to tip growth and immune responses. Eight CNGCs have been identified in the moss Physcomitrium patens, whose functions are largely unexplored. By contrast, in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana essential functions of different CNGCs in the tip growth of root hairs and pollen tubes have already been established. In order to investigate the role of CNGCs in tip growth in moss, P. patens CNGC knock-out lines were generated using CRISPR/Cas methodology. Four different cngc single KO lines, two cngc double KO lines and one cngc triple KO line were established. Despite extensive efforts, it was not possible to generate KO lines disrupted in the expression of the remaining four CNGCs, indicating essential functions of these channels in moss. Investigation of the established cngc KO lines has shown that three P. patens CNGCs in fact modulate tip growth in protonemata. cngc-b, cngc-c, and cngc-h single KO lines, as well as two of the cngc double KO lines, showed significantly increased elongation of protonemal cells. This effect was particularly pronounced in the cngc-b / cngc-c double knockout line, which indicates additive functional interactions between CNGCc and CNGCb.

Furthermore, experiments were performed to establish an optogenetic system in P. patens. Optogenetics is a cell biological method, which enables the control of processes in living cells by light pulses using light-sensitive proteins. In cooperation with Prof. Dr. Nagel from the University of Würzburg, transgenic P. patens lines were generated expressing a recombinant channel rhodopsin tagged with a green fluorescent protein (ChR-2-XXL::GFP). Similar channel rhodopsins have already been used successfully in neurobiology to generate light-induced action potentials. Channel rhodopsin-2 is a light-controlled cation channel from the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. On the basis of this protein, Prof. Dr. Nagel developed the ChR-2-XXL channel, which allows blue-light-controlled local stimulation of Ca2+ import through the plasma membrane. This channel was successfully expressed for the first time in P. patens, and was found to be targeted to plasma membrane of protonemata cells, an important prerequisite for its function in Ca2+ import. In addition, a dioxygenase fused to a chloroplast targeting sequence was demonstrated to be imported into chloroplasts, where this enzyme can synthesize retinal using ß-carotene as a precursor. Retinal is essential for the function of the ChR-2-XXL channel. With this system it should now be possible to examine effects on tip growth of local cell depolarization triggered by blue light stimulation.

In the “Cell Biology Divison” at FAU, the role of Rac/Rop-dependent signal cascades in the control of tip growth in plants has been investigated for many years. The work described here represents an excellent basis for the future investigation of functional interactions between Rac/Rop- and Ca2+-dependent signal cascades in the moss P. patens.

___

Johanna Knab conducted this work in the FAU Division of Cell Biology under the supervision of Dr. Maria Ntefidou in the team of Prof. Dr. Benedikt Kost.

Joelle Kröll (Innsbruck University)

The two until now as subgernera adressed forms should be handled as two distinct species. The left, S. (pubescens subsp.) pubescens, occurs in the eastern Pyrenees, along the more or less continuous mountain range south and east of the Cerdanya/Cerdagne valley. The rightS. (pubescens subsp.) iratiana occurs on the highest summits and crests of the central and western Pyrenees. Photos: Pau Carnicero

Joelle Kröll's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Innsbruck University in the year 2020.

Title: Allopolyploidy, introgression and morphological differentiation in the Pyrenean endemic Saxifraga pubescens of awarded thesis

Multiple data sources unravel inconspicuous diversity in a Pyrenean high mountain endemic: from one to two species, genome duplications and recurring hybridization

Hybridization is an important evolutionary force in plants, which can either lead to reduction of differentiation through introgressive hybridization or increase in diversity due to the appearance of a new evolutionary entity through hybrid speciation. For the latter to take place, hybrids need to overcome two major challenges, i.e. hybrid sterility and backcrossing with the parental lineages. One way to overcome both of these problems is allopolyploidy. Recurrent hybridization with co-occurring species has been reported in the Pyrenean endemic Saxifraga pubescens, but its evolutionary consequences as well as its link to polyploidy remain to date uncertain. Although two subspecies with allopatric distributions are recognised, i.e. S. pubescens subsp. pubescens and S. pubescens subsp. iratiana, some contradictory reports indicate overlapping distributions. Since the species is protected in some areas both in Spain and in France, it is necessary to clarify the intraspecific systematics of S. pubescens. For this purpose, we integrate morphological, relative genome size and molecular data from RADseq and plastid DNA sequencing to infer the evolutionary and biogeographical history of the species, with special focus on hybridization and polyploidy and to propose a congruent systematics framework. We observe both occasional occurrences of hybrids in populations of S. pubescens as well as entirely hybrid populations. Homoploid hybridization seems to generate the occasional hybrids, while the entirely hybrid populations consist of allopolyploids, which indicates fertility of the hybrids and their potential to create hybrid lineages (and eventually species). Morphology allows the proper identification of the two subspecies as well as the hybrids, with the exception of individuals with imbalanced introgression. In addition, the molecular data resolve both subspecies as monophyletic, but the species itself as polyphyletic and indicate that the two subspecies are consistently well-differentiated entities, and should be recognised as two separate species.

The Master thesis of Joelle Kröll was published (in : https://diglib.uibk.ac.at/ulbtirolhs/download/pdf/5341778?originalFilename=true

___

Joelle Kröll conducted this work at the Institute for Botany in the working group Evolutionary Systematics of Univ.-Prof. Mag. Dr. Peter Schönswetter and Ass. Dr. Pau Carnicero.

Levke Valena Höche (Kiel University)

Graphical abstract: We recorded the combined effects of inbreeding, plant sex and geographic origin on spatial flower traits and floral scent of Silene latifolia. Graph: Levke Valena Höche

Levke Valena Höche's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel in the year 2020.

Title: The combined effects of population origin and inbreeding on plant traits attracting pollinating insects

Inbreeding can have a negative impact on floral scent production and spatial flower traits. The magnitude of this effect strongly depends on the sex of plant individuals and the geographic origin of a population.

The attractiveness of a flower towards pollinators is determined by a combination of spatial and olfactory traits. Inbreeding can negatively impact these traits, and its effect can vary within a population between male and female plants, and among populations from different geographical origins.

We recorded differences in spatial and olfactory floral traits in outcrossed and inbred, female and male individuals of the dioecious plant Silene latifolia from eight European and eight North American populations. Additionally, visitation rates by crepuscular pollinators were quantified.

Inbreeding reduced the number and size of the flowers as well as the amount of lilac aldehydes that are essential for chemical communication with crepuscular moths. This effect was partially more pronounced in female than male individuals and varied between populations of different origins. However, this effect was not reflected in the pollinator visitation rates, which had only been investigated during a small timeframe in late summer for logistical reasons. Our results support that inbreeding has the potential to lessen the attractivity of a flower towards pollinating insects, and that sex-specific selection and the evolutionary history of a population shape the underlying genetic architecture.

___

Levke Valena Höche conducted this work at the Institute for Ecosystem Research / Department Geobotany, supervised by Dr. Karin Schrieber.

Nora Stingl (Marburg University)

Nora Stingl's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Philipps Universität Marburg in the year 2020.

Title: Establishment and optimization of new model organisms to study early land plant evolution

Stingl successfully established three new model organisms and optimised their cultivation conditions for future studies on the conquest of land by plants.

The establishment of new model organisms is crucial to study the water to land transition of plants, which set the fundament to nature how we know it. It is widely accepted that one group from the charophyte algae, more accurate from the ZCC paraphylum, gave rise to the ancestor of land plants. Since no model organisms have yet been established in this group, three organisms were selected as potential model organisms: Chara braunii, Spirogyra pratensis and Mougeotia scalaris. Within this work protocols for laboratory cultivation of all three organisms could be developed. Additionally, sexual reproduction of C. braunii and S. pratensis was successfully induced repeatedly and a protocol for germination of C. braunii oospores was established.

Within the land plants the bryophytes are considered sister taxons of the vascular plants and the hornwort Anthoceros agrestis is already established as a model organism. In this thesis, studies on in vitro cultivation were performed and different growth and germination behavior between axenic and non-axenic cultures could be observed.

___

Nora Stingl conducted this work at the department of biology in the lab of Prof. Dr. Stefan A. Rensing.

09 Oct 2020

50th Newsletter

Sorry, in German only

Was Genomduplikationen bringen, wie die Urwälder Europas zu retten wären und ob Pflanzen mit dem Klimawandel mithalten können, steht in den Forschungsnachrichten. Außerdem im Newsletter: Wie Künstliche Intelligenz neue Methoden für Pflanzenforschende eröffnet, welche neue CRISPR/Cas-Anwendung umgekehrte Genabfolgen rückgängig macht sowie Tipps für Förderungen. Und: Wie unsere DBG gegen Falschmeldungen über Pflanzenforschung vorging und warum sie an die EU appelliert.

zum 50. Newsletter (LogIn erforderlich)

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09 Oct 2020

50th DBG Newsletter

Sorry, in German only

Was Genomduplikationen bringen, wie die Urwälder Europas zu retten wären und ob Pflanzen mit dem Klimawandel mithalten können, steht in den Forschungsnachrichten. Außerdem im Newsletter: Wie Künstliche Intelligenz neue Methoden für Pflanzenforschende eröffnet, welche neue CRISPR/Cas-Anwendung umgekehrte Genabfolgen rückgängig macht sowie Tipps für Förderungen. Und: Wie unsere DBG gegen Falschmeldungen über Pflanzenforschung vorging und warum sie an die EU appelliert.

zum DBG-Newsletter (pdf-Datei)

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On-site Contact Persons

DBG offers direct support at many institutes and universities. The following table provides all people, locations, institutes and contact details. They are assisting us in selecting the best people for our yearly Master Theses Award

Germany

 

 

 

University

Person

Phone

E-mail

Aachen

Prof. Dr. Uwe Conrath

++49 -
(0)241 - 80 265 40

uwe.conrath[at]bio3.rwth-aachen.de

Bayreuth

Prof. Dr.
Stephan Clemens

++49 -
(0)921 - 55 2630

stephan.clemens[at]uni-bayreuth.de

HU Berlin

Prof. Dr. Christian Schmitz-Linneweber

++49 -
(0)30 2093 49700

christian.schmitz-linneweber[at]rz.hu-berlin.de

FU Berlin

Prof. Dr.
Reinhard
Kunze

++49 -
(0)30 838 55802

reinhard.kunze[at]fu-berlin.de

Bielefeld

Prof. Dr. Karl-Josef Dietz

++49 -
(0)521 - 1065589

karl-josef.dietz[at]uni-bielefeld.de

Bochum

Prof. Dr.
Ulrich
Kück

++49 -
(0)234 -32 26 212

Ulrich.Kueck[at]rub.de

Bonn

Prof. Dr. Andreas Meyer

++49 (0)228 73 60353

andreas.meyer[at]uni-bonn.de   

Braunschweig

Prof. Dr. Dirk Selmar

++49 -
(0)531 - 39 15 881

d.selmar[at]tu-bs.de

Bremen

Prof. Dr.
Uwe
Nehls

++49 -
(0)421 - 218 62901

nehls[at]uni-bremen.de

Darmstadt

Prof. Dr.
Gerhard
Thiel

++49 -
(0)6151 - 16 6050

thiel[at]bio.tu-darmstadt.de

Dresden

Prof. Dr. Jutta Ludwig-Müller

++49-
(0)351-463 33939

jutta.ludwig-mueller[at]mailbox.tu-dresden.de

Düsseldorf

Prof. Dr. Peter Jahns

++49- (0)211 81-13862

pjahns[at]uni-duesseldorf.de

Erlangen

Prof. Dr.
Uwe Sonnewald

++49 -
(0)9131 85 282 55
 

uwe.sonnewald[at]fau.de

Essen

Prof. Dr. Hardy Pfanz

++49
(0)201 - 183 21 53

hardy.pfanz[at]uni-essen.de

Frankfurt am Main

Prof. Dr. Claudia Büchel

++49 -
(0)69 - 79 82 47 68

C.Buechel[at]em.uni-frankfurt.de

Freiburg

Prof. Dr.
Micheal Scherer-Lorenzen

++49 -
(0)761 - 203 - 5014

michael.scherer[at]biologie.uni-freiburg.de

Gatersleben

Dr. Hans-Peter Mock

++49 -
(0)39482 - 53 86

mock[at]IPK-Gatersleben.de

Giessen

Prof. Dr. Volker Wissemann

++49 (0)641 - 99 35 170

Volker.Wissemann[at]bot1.bio.uni-giessen.de

Göttingen

Dr. Dieter Heineke

++49 -
(0)551 - 39 57 43

dheinek[at]gwdg.de

Greifswald

Prof. Dr. Christine Stöhr

++49 -
(0)3834 - 86 41 04

stoehr[at]uni-greifswald.de

Halle

Prof. Dr. Ingo Heilmann

++49 -
(0)345 55-24840

ingo.heilmann[at]biochemtech.uni-halle.de

Hamburg

Prof. Dr. Dieter Hanelt

++49 -
(0)40 - 42816-372

dieter.hanelt[at]botanik.uni-hamburg.de

Hannover

Prof. Dr. Christoph Peterhänsel

++49 -
(0)511 - 76 22 632

cp[at]botanik.uni-hannover.de

Heidelberg

Prof. Dr. Rüdiger Hell

++49 -
(0)6221 - 54 62 84

ruediger.hell[at]cos.uni-heidelberg.de

Hohenheim

Prof. Dr. Christian Zörb

++49 - (0)711 - 459 22520

christian.zoerb[at]uni-hohenheim.de

Jena

Prof. Dr. Ralf Oelmüller

++49 -
(0)3641 - 949230

Ralf.Oelmueller[at]uni-jena.de

Kaiserslautern

Prof. Dr.
Ekkehard
Neuhaus

++49 -
(0)631 - 20 52 372

neuhaus[at]rhrk.uni-kl.de

Karlsruhe

Prof. Dr. Peter Nick

++49 -
(0)721 - 608 2144

peter.nick[at]kit.edu

Kassel

 

++49 -
(0)561 -

 

Kiel

Prof. Dr. Margret Sauter

++49 -
(0)431 - 880 4210

msauter[at]bot.uni-kiel.de

Köln

Prof. Dr.
Ulf-Ingo
Flügge

++49 -
(0)221 - 47 02 484

fluegge[at]uni-koeln.de

Konstanz

Prof. Dr. Peter Kroth

++49 -
(0)7531 - 88 48 16

peter.kroth[at]uni-konstanz.de

Leipzig

Prof. Dr.
Severin Sasso

++49 -
(0)341 - 97 36 893

severin.sasso[at]uni-leipzig.de

Mainz

Prof. Dr. Andreas Wachter

++49 -
(0)6131 39-289 08

wachter[at]uni-mainz.de

Marburg

Prof. Dr. Stefan A. Rensing

++49 (0)6421 - 28 - 21940

stefan.rensing[at]biologie.uni-marburg.de

LMU München

Prof. Dr. Hans Henning Kunz

++49 -
(0)89 - 2180 - 747 50

hanshenningkunz[at]gmail.com

TU München

Prof. Dr. Erwin Grill

++49 -
(0)8161 - 71 54 33

grill[at]wzw.tum.de

Münster

Prof. Dr.
Iris Finkemeier

++49 -
(0)251 - 83 23805

 

iris.finkemeier[at]uni-muenster.de

Oldenburg

Prof. Dr. Dirk Albach

++49 (0)441 7983339

dirk.albach[at]uni-oldenburg.de

Osnabrück

Prof. Dr.
Renate
Scheibe

++49 -
(0)541 - 96 92 284

scheibe[at]biologie.uni-osnabrueck.de

Potsdam

Prof. Dr. Martin Steup

++49 -
(0)331 - 9771 909
or -1902

msteup[at]rz.uni-potsdam.de

Regensburg

Prof. Dr. Peter Poschlod

++49 -
(0)943 - 3108

peter.poschlod[at]ur.de

Rostock

Prof. Dr.
Birgit
Piechulla

++49 -
(0)381 - 49 86 130

birgit.piechulla[at]uni-rostock.de

Saarbrücken

Prof. Dr. Katrin Philippar

++49 - (0)681 - 302 58160

katrin.philippar[at]uni-saarland.de

Stuttgart

 s. Hohenheim

 

 

Tübingen

Prof. Dr.
Klaus
Harter

++49 -
(0)7071 - 29 76 05

klaus.harter[at]zmbp.uni-tuebingen.de

Ulm

Prof. Dr. Stefan Binder

++49 -
(0)731 - 502 26 25

stefan.binder[at]uni-ulm.de

Würzburg

Prof. Dr.
Rainer
Hedrich

++49 -
(0)931 - 88 86 101

hedrich[at]botanik.uni-wuerzburg.de

Austria

 

 

 

University

Person

Phone 

E-mail 

Innsbruck

Assoz.-Prof. Dr. Andreas Holzinger

++43 512 507-51028

Andreas.Holzinger[at]uibk.ac.at

Salzburg

Prof. Dr.
Raimund Tenhaken

++43 -
662 - 80445551

raimund.tenhaken[at]sbg.ac.at

Wien

Prof. Dr. Jürg Schönenberger

++43 - (0)1 4277-540 80

juerg.schoenenberger[at]univie.ac.at

Switzerland

 

 

 

University

 Person

 Phone

 E-mail

Basel

Prof. Dr. Christian Körner

++41 -
61 - 26 73 510

Ch.Koerner[at]unibas.ch

Zürich

Prof. Enrico Martinoia

++41 -
44 63 48 222

Enrico.Martinoia[at]botinst.uzh.ch

Zürich [ETH]

Prof. Wilhelm Gruissem

++41 -
44 - 632 0857

wilhelm_gruissem[at]ethz.ch

Melanie Kastl (Köln University)

Melanie Kastl's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Köln University in the year 2019.

Title: Functional characterization of the Ustilago maydis organ-specific effectors: UMAG05306 and UMAG11060

Two effectors of Ustilago maydis, the causative agent of corn smut disease, were localized in planta and their (putative) targets were identified and described.

Ustilago maydis parasitizes all aerial parts of the maize plant by inducing tumour formation. In order to establish biotrophy, U. maydis secretes effectors that inhibit the plant defence responses and modulate the host metabolism. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and localization assays with fluorescent labelled effectors were performed to functionally characterize two U. maydis effectors including UMAG5306 and UMAG11060. We have shown that both effectors are secreted during host colonization and involved in fungal virulence. Furthermore, interaction studies revealed that UMAG05306 interacts and/or modulate with plant cytoskeleton, while UMAG11060 interacts with host defence component to suppress immunity. These findings will bring more insight in how fungi interfere with the plant immune system and to understand the mechanism of susceptibility and resistance.

___

Melanie Kastl conducted this work at the Institute of Botany/ Chair of Terrestrial Microbiology in the group of Prof. Dr. Gunther Döhlemann.

09 Sep 2020

Statement: Keine Nachweismethode für genomeditierte Nutzpflanzen

Sorry, in German only (translates: no method to detect genome editing in crops)

Die gentechnische Methode, mit der ein genetisch veränderter Raps erzeugt wurde, lässt sich nicht mit einer quantitativen Polymerasekettenreaktion (qPCR) nachweisen. Dies kann nicht so nicht funktionieren, wie es ein kürzlich in der Zeitschrift Foods erschienener Artikel nahelegt1). Die im Foods-Artikel beschriebene Methode eignet sich lediglich für den Nachweis und die Quantifizierung einer spezifischen Punktmutation im Gen AHAS1C. Diese Mutation ist in der von der Firma Cibus entwickelten Raps-Sorte Falco enthalten, die resistent gegen Sulfonylharnstoff- und Imidazolinon-Herbizide ist. Die Methode weist also lediglich ein spezielles DNA-Muster in dieser Raps-Pflanze nach.

Die in der Zeitschrift erwähnte Methode eignet sich jedoch nicht, die Ursache der Punktmutation festzustellen, also ob sie durch die modernen Methoden der Genomeditierung entstand oder durch ungerichtete, zufällige Mutagenese etwa nach radioaktiver Bestrahlung. Somit steht auch keine Methode zur Verfügung, mit Genscheren erzeugte Nutzpflanzen durch eine quantitative Polymerasekettenreaktion (qPCR) nachzuweisen.

Es ist zudem keineswegs sicher, dass die untersuchten Rapslinien tatsächlich durch Genomeditierung mit Hilfe der Oligonukleotid-vermittelten Mutagenese (ODM) erzeugt wurden. Im Gegenteil ist vielmehr davon auszugehen, dass die Punktmutation in dem oben genannten Gen der Elternlinie BnALS-57 nicht durch ODM, sondern spontan während der Gewebekultur entstanden ist (somaklonale Variation), wie eine Studie nahelegt2).
 
Diese Methode ist somit ungeeignet, durch Genomeditierung erzeugtes Saatgut (im Sinne der EU Direktive 2001/18/EC) von nicht reguliertem Saatgut (also in der EU-Direktive ausgenommenen Verfahren wie Strahlungs- oder chemische Mutagenese) zu unterscheiden.

Eine Nachweismethode für die genetischen Veränderungen von Pflanzen, die mit den neuen Verfahren der Genom-Editerung entstanden sind, wäre die Voraussetzung um die oben erwähnte, vom EuGH erlassene Richtlinie umsetzen zu können. Demnach müssen die neuen Methoden wie die frühere Gentechnik reguliert werden, in der jedoch oft fremde Gene eingebracht wurden, die sich einfach nachweisen lassen.

Auch wenn der Foods-Artikel dies nahelegt, ist es weiterhin nicht möglich mit Genomeditierung erzeugte Nutzpflanzen von in der Natur zufällig mutierten oder durch radioaktive bzw. chemische Mutagenese entstandenen Pflanzen zu unterscheiden.   

Die DBG appelliert daher weiterhin an das Europäische Parlament und die Europäische Kommission, die bestehende europäische Richtlinie für die Präzisionszüchtung für Pflanzen, zu überarbeiten und wissenschaftliche Erkenntnisse über die Genomeditierung zu berücksichtigen.

---

Prof. Dr. Andreas P.M. Weber (Biochemie der Pflanzen, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf),
Sprecher des Exzellenz-Clusters für Pflanzenforschung CEPLAS und
Präsident unserer Deutschen Botanischen Gesellschaft (DBG)


1) Chhalliyil et al. (2020): A Real-Time Quantitative PCR Method Specific for Detection and Quantification of the First Commercialized Genome-Edited Plant. Foods, 9, 1245

2) Novel Food Information - Cibus Canola Event 5715 (Imidazolinone and Sulfonylurea Herbicide Tolerant). https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/food-nutrition/genetically-modified-foods-other-novel-foods/approved-products/novel-food-information-cibus-canola-event-5715-imidazolinone-sulfonylurea-herbicide-tolerant.html). Kanadisches Gesundheitsministerium, abgerufen am 9.9.2020

24 Jul 2020

Open Statement on the Regulation of Genome Edited Plants and Crops

The EU and New Zealand differ from most other countries and their regulations for precision breeding techniques (see Schmidt, Belisle, Frommer (2020), EMBO Rep 2020, e50680, https://doi.org/10.15252/embr.202050680)

132 European research institutes and science associations – with DBG being one of them - strongly recommend to the European Council, European Parliament and the European Commission to revise the existing directive for precision breeding, also known as genome editing. This is not only important for recovery from the COVID-19 crisis but also since genome-editing offers many solutions for a fast, relatively simple and much more directed way to create resilience to climate change compared to previous breeding techniques. Moreover the breeding of plants that are less dependent on fertilizers and pesticides is more efficient. Use of these methods preserves natural resources of our planet and supports to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations as well as the Green Deal of the EU. The European Sustainable Agriculture through Genome Editing (EU-SAGE) Network, under which the institutions named above are unified, recommends the European Commission to endorse this message for the benefit and welfare of all EU citizens and to adapt the current regulations to use genome-editing for crop and plant breeding to recent scientific results. In its Open Statement the EU-SAGE network cites scientific studies that demonstrate the successful creation of genome-edited plants with resilience to climate change and resistance against pests and diseases and therefore higher yields and revenues. Other studies have proven to reduce the dependency on pesticides by improving resistance against diseases in rice, wine, wheat, and grapefruit. In addition precision breeding accelerates the introduction of healthy traits into vegetables and fruits, as studies have shown.

Read EU-SAGE's whole open statement (pdf)

Download
17 Jul 2020

49th DBG Newsletter

Sorry, in German only

Gleich drei Publikationen belegen (mindestens) eine Doppelrolle von Proteinen und zeigen eindrucksvoll, wie komplex Pflanzen sind. In diesen schwierigen Zeiten wurden erfreulich viele hochrangige Publikationen veröffentlicht, und so können wir auch von einem neuen Pflanzenstamm berichten. Vier neue Methoden und vier Konsortien runden unsere Forschungsnachrichten ab. Leider müssen wir derzeit auf viele Zusammenkünfte verzichten. So sind zwei Sektionstagungen auf zunächst unbestimmte Zeit verschoben, wohingegen das Treffen einer unserer sechs Sektion ins Virtuelle verlagert wird.

zum DBG-Newsletter (pdf-Datei)

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17 Jul 2020

49th Newsletter

Sorry, in German only

Gleich drei Publikationen belegen (mindestens) eine Doppelrolle von Proteinen und zeigen eindrucksvoll, wie komplex Pflanzen sind. In diesen schwierigen Zeiten wurden erfreulich viele hochrangige Publikationen veröffentlicht, und so können wir auch von einem neuen Pflanzenstamm berichten. Vier neue Methoden und vier Konsortien runden die Forschungsnachrichten ab.
Leider müssen wir auf viele Zusammenkünfte verzichten. So sind zwei Sektionstagungen auf zunächst unbestimmte Zeit verschoben, wohingegen das Treffen einer unserer sechs Sektion vermutlich ins Virtuelle verlagert wird.

zum 49. Newsletter (LogIn erforderlich)

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20 May 2020

48th DBG Newsletter

Sorry, in German only

Welches Modell hilft, um neue Pflanzenwirkstoffe zu entdecken, wo die Pflanzenvielfalt abnimmt und an welchem unerwarteten Ort einst ein ganzer Regenwald wuchs, zeigen unsere Forschungsnachrichten. Unser Newsletter berichtet außerdem, wer einen ERC-Grant für eine neue Züchtungstechnik für die Landwirtschaft erhielt. Die DBG freut sich, den Preisträger der besten pflanzenwissenschaftlichen Publikation eines Nachwuchsforschers bekannt zu geben. Die Sektionen für Angewandte Botanik präsentiert sich mit einer neuen Website.

zum DBG-Newsletter (pdf-Datei)

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20 May 2020

48th Newsletter

Sorry, in German only

Welches Modell hilft, um neue Pflanzenwirkstoffe zu entdecken, wo die Pflanzenvielfalt abnimmt und an welchem unerwarteten Ort einst ein ganzer Regenwald wuchs, zeigen unsere Forschungsnachrichten. Unser Newsletter berichtet außerdem, wer einen ERC-Grant für eine neue Züchtungstechnik für die Landwirtschaft erhielt. Die DBG freut sich, den Preisträger der besten pflanzenwissenschaftlichen Publikation eines Nachwuchsforschers bekannt zu geben. Die Sektionen für Angewandte Botanik präsentiert sich mit einer neuen Website. Weitere Forschungsnachrichten und Meldungen aus unseren Sektionen runden den Newsletter ab.

zum 48. Newsletter (LogIn erforderlich)

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14 May 2020

Actualia has a new editor

In 1998 Actualia were published as printed supplement of our journal Botanica Acta, which now is Plant Biology.

Prof. Dr. Christian Wilhelm has handed over his editorial function in Actualia to Dr. Jutta Ludwig-Müller after having filled this position for 23 years now.

Der Herausgeber unserer Actualia, Seniorprofessor Dr. Christian Wilhelm (Uni Leipzig) übergibt nach 23 Jahren dieses Ehrenamt nun Professorin Dr. Jutta Ludwig-Müller von der TU Dresden. Was unsere neue Herausgeberin auszeichnet, was die Actualia leistet, wie sie entstand und welchen Arbeiten Wilhelm sich nun zuwendet, schildert dieser Artikel.

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27 Mar 2020

47th DBG Newsletter

Sorry, in German only

Ein Protein-Atlas für Arabidopsis, wie Wurzeln Wasser finden und wie das Erbgut eines zweiten Vaters eingeschmuggelt werden kann, sind Themen in unseren Forschungsnachrichten.
Nur noch wenige Tage bleiben unseren Mitgliedern, die ein gutes Paper von Nachwuchskräften mit Lorbeeren bekränzt sehen möchten. Die DFG bittet uns um fachlichen Input zur Bewertung zukünftiger Datenstrategien. Berichte über drei Tagungen sowie die Förderinstrumente der DBG runden unseren Newsletter aus den diversen Home-Offices in dieser beispiellosen Zeit ab.

zum DBG-Newsletter (pdf-Datei)

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27 Mar 2020

47th Newsletter

Sorry, in German only

Ein Protein-Atlas für Arabidopsis, wie Wurzeln Wasser finden und wie das Erbgut eines zweiten Vaters eingeschmuggelt werden kann, sind Themen in unseren Forschungsnachrichten.
Nur noch wenige Tage bleiben unseren Mitgliedern, die ein gutes Paper von Nachwuchskräften mit Lorbeeren bekränzt sehen möchten. Die DFG bittet uns um fachlichen Input zur Bewertung zukünftiger Datenstrategien. Berichte über drei Tagungen sowie die Förderinstrumente der DBG runden unseren Newsletter aus den diversen Home-Offices in dieser beispiellosen Zeit ab.

zum 47. Newsletter (LogIn erforderlich)

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Cathrin Manz (Philipps-Universität Marburg)

Cathrin Manz's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Philipps-Universität Marburg in the year 2019.

Title: "Diversity assessment of the ectomycorrhizal genus Russula in tropical montane forests in Panama"

For the first time Manz investigated the diversity of Russula species (“brittlegills”) in the mountain rainforests of Panama. More than 45 species were discovered for the first time for Panama with many of them new to science.

The diversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi in the tropics is still largely underexplored, even though they constitute a key component of tropical montane forest ecosystems. In this study, 106 collections of the genus Russula (“brittlegills”) were collected in Chiriquí, Panama and described as fresh fruiting bodies. The samples were analysed with phylogenetic methods using the universal fungal barcode ITS. The resulting phylogenetic tree revealed a total number of 90 Russula species in Panama of which 47 species were newly recorded for this country. Among these samples are many putatively new species. A selection of four new Russula species from subsection Roseinae were analysed morphologically by light and scanning electron microscopy in the context of the master thesis. Five patterns for ectomycorrhizal partners and geographic distribution were revealed. Facing habitat loss and climate change, it is today more than ever necessary to collect and store specimens with associated data and to openly share these resources. Otherwise many species will become extinct unnoticed.

___

Cathrin Manz conducted this work at the Department of Biology in the Research group mycology by Karl-Heinz Rexer.

31 Jan 2020

46. Newsletter der DBG

Sorry, in German only

Mit welchen Molekülen Embryo und Endosperm kommunizieren, welche Schalter den Energiestoffwechsel im Samen anwerfen und welche neue Methoden und Werkzeuge die pflanzenwissenschaftliche Gemeinschaft nutzt und zur Verfügung stellt sind Themen in unseren Forschungsnachrichten. 

Die DBG bittet um Nominierungen für das beste pflanzenwissenschaftliche Paper. Sie präsentiert außerdem die ausgezeichneten Master-Arbeiten und die Themen der Preistragenden, die von den Wurzeln bis in die Baumkronen reichen und Ökologie, Molekularbiologie, Interaktionen, Biochemie sowie Evolution umfassen.

zum DBG-Newsletter (pdf-Datei)

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31 Jan 2020

46th Newsletter

Sorry, in German only

Mit welchen Molekülen Embryo und Endosperm kommunizieren, welche Schalter den Energiestoffwechsel im Samen anwerfen und welche neue Methoden und Werkzeuge die pflanzenwissenschaftliche Gemeinschaft nutzt und zur Verfügung stellt sind Themen in unseren Forschungsnachrichten. 

Die DBG bittet um Nominierungen für das beste pflanzenwissenschaftliche Paper. Sie präsentiert außerdem die ausgezeichneten Master-Arbeiten und die Themen der Preistragenden, die von den Wurzeln bis in die Baumkronen reichen und Ökologie, Molekularbiologie, Interaktionen, Biochemie sowie Evolution umfassen.

zum 46. Newsletter (LogIn)

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Imprint

Information according to § 5 TMG (German Telemediengesetzt)

Deutsche Botanische Gesellschaft (DBG) e.V., Berlin, Germany

Represented by

The German Society for Plant Sciences is represented through the president, the vice president (general secretary) or the treasurer (§3 of the Statutes). Contact: E-mails, Telefone and Adresses can be viewed under Board

Contact  /Offices

Dr. Thomas Janßen
Secretary
Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
Institut für Biologie
AG Botanik und Arboretum
Späth-Arboretum
Späthstr. 80/81
12437 Berlin
Germany
Tel. +49 (0)30 636 6941
Fax +49 (0)30 636 9446
E-Mail: thomas.janssen[at]biologie.hu-berlin.de

Prof. Dr. Caroline Müller
Secretary General
Department of Chemical Ecology, Bielefeld University, W1-142,
Universitätsstraße 25, D-33615 Bielefeld, Germany
Phone: +49 521 106-5524
Phone (Secretary): +49 521 106-67041
Fax: +49 521 106-2963
E-mail: caroline.mueller[at]uni-bielefeld.de

Registration Entry

Entry at Vereinsregister Registergericht: Amtsgericht Berlin-Charlottenburg
Register number: VR 2872 B

Image Sources

Images either derive from the stated source or were provided by DBG members: Dominik Begerow, Maximilian Berthold, Ute Bürstenbinder, Karin Glaser, Vera Göhre, Daniela Mandel, Oscar Perez, Volker Wissemann, Monique Liebers. Some of them derive from "The Images and Design Community www.iStockphoto.com" Copyright: fotolinchen, nasenmann, AndreasReh, Sandralise, Yuri, Jacob Wackerhausen, and strukolga.

Editorial Office and Concept

Sci-Stories.com, E-Mail: dbg[at]wissensworte.de

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E-Mail: webmaster[at]deutsche-botanische-gesellschaft.de

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Parts of this site which are offered in other than the German language are solely a service for people who don't understand German. The legally binding language is German.

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Please also study the disclaimer and our regulations for data privacy.

This legal declaration also applies for

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Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/PflanzenwissenschaftenDBG

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About us

The section Natural Products brings together scientists of several generations who are interested in various aspects of natural products research ranging from biosynthesis over physiological and ecological function and evolution to biotechnological production of natural plant products. The sections furthers scientific exchange between its members and supports early career scientists.

Activities

Members of the section receive information about activities of the section, section meetings, workshops and relevant job announcements via Email.

Scientific meetings

The section Natural Products meets every second year (alternating with Botanikertagung) for a symposium. These meetings provide a nice platform for scientific exchange and  are especially devoted to young scientists. PhD students and postdocs have the opportunity to present their work, to discuss it in an informal atmosphere and to build their scientific network.

The next section meeting will be held in Jena, Germany, on October 02-04, 2020.

Membership

Members pay a yearly fee of 10 €. Members of our head organisation, Deutsche Botanische Gesellschaft (DBG), can become a member of our section through the DBG website.

Please contact the section's speakers if you have questions, suggestions or requests.

Prize for the Best Plant Science Publication

The Wilhelm Pfeffer Foundation awards every other year the best publication with a sum of 1000 Euros. The prize will only be awarded for publications deriving from Diploma, Master or PhD thesis.

Awardees and their paper will be introduced during the upcoming Botanikertagung 2021 and the awarded paper will be listed on DBG's website.

Only members of the German Society for Plant Sciences (DBG) are eligible to submit nominations; self-nomonations are also accepted for this prize.

The Prize, casually speaking Best Paper Prize, can be devided. There is no right to receive the prize.

Application

The following documents should be sent for application:

  • Paper (pdf file)
  • Peer review comments of the journal
  • Letter of reference from the academic advisor of the paper. This should also mention in which context (master, diploma or PhD thesis) this work was carried out.

    Deadlines

    Proposals can be submitted each year (31 March); dates are communicated via the website. Please send your application to the president of the Wilhelm Pfeffer Foundation.

    09 Jan 2020

    Protokoll der Mitgliederversammmlung

    Das Protokoll der DBG-Mitgliederversammlung vom 18. September 2019 in Rostock steht nun zum Download zur Verfügung.

    zum Protokoll (pdf-Datei)

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    03 Jan 2020

    Two new board members take over their offices

    Prof. Dr. Andreas Weber (right) and Prof. Dr. Andreas Meyer. Photos: private

    Our new president and another board member duly started their offices on first of January. Prof. Dr. Andreas Weber, molecular biologist Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) holding several offices, and Prof. Dr. Andreas Meyer, chair for Chemical Signalling at INRES of Bonn University were elected during the member assembly in Rostock, Germany, in September last year. All other board members were re-elected.

    Read more about their election

    Read more

    Contact

    Speaker and Secretary

    Speaker

    Prof. Dr. Dirk Selmar
    Technische Universität Braunschweig
    Institut für Angewandte Pflanzenbiologie
    Mendelssohnstraße 4
    38106 Braunschweig
    Phone: ++49 (0)531-391-5881
    Email: d.selmar[at]tu-bs.de
    Website: https://www.tu-braunschweig.de/ifp/selmar

    Deputy Speaker

    Dr. Helmut Kassner
    Uni Hamburg, Biozentrum Klein Flottbek, Abt. Nutzpflanzenbiologie
    Ohnhorststr. 18
    D-22609 Hamburg
    Phone: +49 (0)40 42816 349
    Email: helmut.kassner[at]uni-hamburg.de
    Website: https://www.biologie.uni-hamburg.de/biozentrum-klein-flottbek/forschung/bdnp-cierjacks/mitarbeiter/m-cierjacks/hkassner.html

    Secretary

    Prof. Dr. Jutta Papenbrock
    Institut für Botanik
    Leibniz Universität Hannover
    Herrenhäuser Str. 2, 30419 Hannover
    Phone: ++49 (0)511 762 3788
    Fax: ++49 (0)511 762 19262
    Email: Jutta.Papenbrock[at]botanik.uni-hannover.de
    Website: https://www.botanik.uni-hannover.de/stoffwechsel.html?&L=1

    Board Members following September 2019

    The board of the Wilhelm Pfeffer Foundation of the German Society for Plant Sciences (DBG) comprizes of four members:

    President

    Prof. Dr. Severin Sasso
    Institut für Biologie
    Abtl. Pflanzenphysiologie
    Johannisallee 21-23
    04103 Leipzig
    Tel.: ++49 (0) 341-9736893
    E-mail: severin.sasso[at]uni-leipzig.de
    Web: https://biologie.lw.uni-leipzig.de/en/institut/ag/plant-physiology/

    Treasurer

    o.Univ. Prof. Dr. Raimund Tenhaken
    Pflanzenphysiologie
    Universität Salzburg
    Hellbrunnerstr. 34
    5020 Salzburg, Austria
    Phone: ++43 (0)662 8044 5551
    Fax: ++43 (0)662 8044 619
    E-Mail: raimund.tenhaken[at]sbg.ac.at

    Additional Board Members

    Apl. Prof. Dr. Gudrun Kadereit (vice president)
    Institut für Molekulare Physiologie
    AG Biodiversität und Evolution der Pflanzen
    Herbarium MJG
    Anselm-Franz-von-Bentzelweg 9a
    Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
    55099 Mainz
    Tel.: ++49- (0)6131-3922537
    Fax ++49- (0)6131-3923524
    Web: http://iabserv.biologie.uni-mainz.de/eng/442.php
    E-Mail: clausing<AT>uni-mainz.de

    Prof. Dr. Stefan Hoth
    Professur Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie
    Abteilungsleiter
    Biozentrum Klein Flottbek
    Ohnhorststr. 18
    22609 Hamburg
    Phone: ++49 (0)40 42816-582
    Fax: ++49 (0)40 42816-696
    E-Mail: stefan.hoth[at]uni-hamburg.de

    09 Dec 2019

    45th DBG Newsletter

    Sorry, in German only

    Warum Grünkohl erst nach dem ersten Frost schmeckt, in wie vielen Pflanzenfamilien die C4-Photosynthese „erfunden“ wurde und dass horizontaler Gentransfer von Bakterien in Algen erst den Landgang der Pflanzen möglich machte, sind Themen in unseren Forschungsnachrichten.
    Forschende sollen mehr über ihre Wissenschaft informieren, wünschen sich Bürgerinnen und Bürger. Derweil etabliert die Wissenschaftsministerin das Thema Wissenschaftskommunikation als Voraussetzung für zukünftige Förderungen. Und unser zum Jahresende ausscheidende Präsident blickt auf seine Amtszeit zurück.

    zum DBG-Newsletter (pdf-Datei)

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    09 Dec 2019

    45th DBG Newsletter

    Sorry, in German only

    Warum Grünkohl erst nach dem ersten Frost schmeckt, in wie vielen Pflanzenfamilien die C4-Photosynthese „erfunden“ wurde und dass horizontaler Gentransfer von Bakterien in Algen erst den Landgang der Pflanzen möglich machte, sind Themen in unseren Forschungsnachrichten.Forschende sollen mehr über ihre Wissenschaft informieren, wünschen sich Bürgerinnen und Bürger. Derweil etabliert die Wissenschaftsministerin das Thema Wissenschaftskommunikation als Voraussetzung für zukünftige Förderungen. Und unser zum Jahresende ausscheidende Präsident blickt auf seine Amtszeit zurück.

    to 45th Newsletter (member's LogIn necessary)

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    Helen Ballasus (Leipzig University)

    Graphical Abstract. Graph: Helen Ballasus

    Helen Ballasus's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Leipzig University in the year 2019.

    Title: Species effects on temperature regulation mechanisms in the tree canopies at the Leipzig canopy crane

    Processes controlling and affecting canopy microclimate are related to the species with its specific structural and physiological functional traits and meteorological predictors depending on vertical canopy architecture.

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    Erik Pischke (Rostock University)

    Erik Pischke's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Rostock University in the year 2019.

    Title:

    The role of the leucine biosynthesis for Pb tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    He found out that the heavy metal lead can differentially affect the growth of ecotypes and mutants of A. thaliana and that an enzyme involved in leucine biosynthesis is essential for Pb tolerance.

    Natural variance of lead tolerance was tested for different ecotypes of A. thaliana to identify molecular mechanism involved in Pb tolerance. Liquid seedling assays were performed, and root lengths were measured upon exposure to Pb. Genome wide association analysis had pointed at enzymes of leucine biosynthesis. Therefore, respective mutants were studied. They showed strong Pb hypersensitivity in comparison to the reference wildtype. A partial rescue of the lead-affected phenotype was observed when leucine was supplied to the medium. Upcoming experiments will aim at understanding the genetic and metabolic reasons for the impacts that Pb has on the leucine biosynthesis in A. thaliana.

    ___

    Erik Pischke conducted this work as external Master thesis at the University of Rostock at the Department of Plant Genetics of Prof. Dr. Renate Horn cooperation with the University of Bayreuth at the Department of Plant Physiology of Prof. Dr. Stephan Clemens.

    Nicola Schmidt (Technical University Dresden)

    Beets were ste objects Nicola Schmidt studied in the greenhouse of the biological institute at Technical University Dresden.

    Nicola Schmidt s Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Technical University Dresden in the year 2019.

    Title:

    Characterisation of the endogenous phytopararetrovirus beetEPRV3 in the sugar beet genome (Beta vulgaris), a new member of the florendoviruses within the Caulimoviridae family

    For the first time, the three endopararetrovirus families within the sugar beet genome were described and analysed focusing on the family beetEPRV3. The element structure turned out to be characteristic for the respective beetEPRV family, pointing to specific evolutionary scenarios. Further, the viral sequences were found to be located within highly AT-rich heterochromatin, which provides an explanation for lacking virulence of beetEPRVs.

    Endopararetroviruses (EPRVs) are a widespread component of animal and plant genomes as a result of the integration of the viral DNA. A reactivation can cause devastating diseases, as it is known for tobacco or petunia. Using comprehensive bioinformatic methods, in this work the EPRVs within the sugar beet genome were identified and assigned to the florendoviruses, which is an abundant genus within the Caulimoviridae. The element structure was reconstructed for all three beetEPRV families. Two families (beetEPRV1 and beetEPRV3) show intact copies, whereas the third family (beetEPRV2) is arranged in a more fragmented manner. The family beetEPRV3 was furthermore analysed using molecular biological and cytogenetic methods like Southern hybridisation and fluorescent in situ hybridisation. It turned out that EPRVs belonging to this family accumulate in tight, repetitive and therefore mostly inaccessible DNA regions, allowing them to escape the host’s elimination mechanisms. These findings may help to understand how EPRVs keep their virulence in some hosts over long periods.

    ___

    Nicola Schmidt conducted this work at the chair of Plant Cell and Molecular Biology in the group of Prof. Dr. Thomas Schmidt.

    Paul David Grünhofer (Bonn University)

    Paul David Grünhofer's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn in the year 2019.

    Title:

    Formation and chemical composition of suberin in poplar roots

    Grünhofer analysed spatiotemporal suberin deposition in poplar roots and its chemical composition. Most parts of the results comprise control as well as osmotic stress conditions.

    Plants employ suberization of root tissue as mechanism of protection against various biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. The tissue-specific formation of suberin under control and stress conditions has been investigated by use of in-vitro tissue culture, hydroponics, fluorescence microscopy and gas chromatography. The main focus of this thesis was to establish a scientifically standardized and reproducible method to grow and treat poplar roots with a variety of different stresses, in order to lay a solid foundation for future research. In addition to that it could already be shown by use of fluorescence microscopy that a treatment of the roots with a mild osmotic stress ( 0.4 MPa) resulted in a shift of the onset of suberization towards the root tip, if compared to control conditions. An analytical preparation and examination of the harvested roots by gas chromatography showed a remarkable overlap of the suberin composition to that of the commonly used model organism Arabidopsis thaliana. A quantitative evaluation to answer the question if the mild osmotic stress in fact does induce an increased suberization of the root tissue could not be answered within this work due to limited time. However, answering this question as well as the examination of more severe osmotic stresses (-0.6 MPa and -0.8 MPa) and the treatment of roots with salt stress will follow in the seamlessly started dissertation. These topics are especially interesting due to rising temperatures in the future, which will make water (represented by osmotic stress) and thereby caused salt stress an even more prominent problem in our soils

    ___

    Paul David Grünhofer conducted this thesis at the Institute for Cellular and Molecular Botany (IZMB) in the group of Prof. Dr. Lukas Schreiber.

    Philipp Zamzow (Bielefeld University)

    Orchard in a good maintenance status. The trees show regular pruning of the branches and are surrounded by protective fences. The undergrowth is not mowed too often and the proximity to a forest is given. Picture from 23.05.2018, Photo: Philipp Zamzow

    Philipp Zamzow's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Bielefeld University in the year 2019.

    Title of the thesis: Development and evaluation of selected orchards in the city of Bergkamen between 1990 and 2018

    Two aspects were examined in this thesis: On the one hand, the development and the current state of Bergkamen's orchard meadows was recorded and examined, which in the history of the town had only taken place once in 1990. On the other hand, this work served to review the minimum criteria set by the Landesamt für Natur, Umwelt und Verbraucherschutz (LANUV) for the protection of orchard meadows and pastures.

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    Nathalie Hering (KIT Karlsruhe)

    Nathalie Hering's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at KIT Karlsruhe in the year 2019.

    Title:

    In-situ hybridization in Salvia flowers and closely related Lamiaceae for the detection of developmental genes

    She detected an unexpected occurrence of B-class identity genes in the ovary of adult Salvia flowers and closely related Lamiaceae

    The flower is an evolutionary key innovation that makes a major contribution to the conservation of the species, as a specialized flower-pollinator interaction is the key to preserve the genetic lineage for many species. Within the flower development, there exists so-called "Genes of Speciation", which are significantly involved in producing reproductive barriers. From this, the debate about the species concept could be resolved, as an analysis of these genes could allow a systematically correct classification of the species. In order to understand the flower development in Salvia and closely related Lamiaceae, the temporal and spatial expression pattern of participating homeotic genes must be considered comparatively. Within this work, the expression of the B-class developmental genes GLOBOSA (GLO) and DEFICIENS (DEF) was investigated qualitatively and quantitatively as well as with the help of in-situ hybridization (ISH) in adult Salvia flowers as well as closely related Lamiaceae. ISH is a molecular biology method for the specific detection of nucleic acids in the cell of histological sections in vivo. By applying this method, the developmental genes GLO and DEF could be successfully localized via ISH in the ovary and stamen of flowers of the Lamiaceae.

    The occurrence of the B-class identity gene GLO in the stamens corresponds to the ABC model according to Coen and Meyerowitz. The unexpected localization of the two developmental genes GLO and DEF in the ovary might indicate an evolutionary young, unknown protein or point to a repression of the developmental genes by an unknown microRNA in the fourth whorl. The occurrence of the developmental genes in flowers is confirmed by a qualitative and quantitative gene expression analysis. Accurate temporal expression patterns of the developmental genes could not be detected, only that these genes occur more frequently in late developmental stages of flowering. However, the presence of DEF in the leaf implies an early involvement in the combinatorial network of flower development, in addition to its proper function as a B-class identity gene.

    ___

    Nathalie Hering completed the work at the Botanical Institute I, Department of Biodiversitiy of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in the working group of Prof. Dr. Peter Nick.

    Recepients of our Travel Grants for a Lab Visit

    Until today the following (early career) plant scientists received one of our travel grants for a lab visit to initiate new projects or learn a new plant science technique:

    Mary Beyer (Salzburg University)

    Mary Beyer's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Salzburg University in the year 2019.

    Title

    Is heavy metal hyperaccumulation in Noccaea caerulescens acting as a defence mechanism against herbivores?

    Mary Beyer found out that accumulated heavy metals can have a deterring effect on herbivores, supporting the “elemental defence hypothesis”. However, the degree of this effect depends largely on the type of heavy metal and the species of herbivore as the feeding experiments showed.

    The aim of this thesis was to provide new insights to the “elemental defence hypothesis”. According to this hypothesis, heavy metals act as a defence mechanism, by deterring or killing herbivores and pathogens, which led to a higher accumulation in certain plants (hyperaccumulators). Four types of herbivores (Arion vulgaris, Vanessa cardui, Plutella xylostella and Pieris rapae) were offered plants of the hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens, treated with different concentrations of nickel and zinc, in a free choice feeding trial. The feeding damage on each plant was determined and thus it was assessed if nickel and/or zinc had any effect on the herbivores feeding behaviour.

    The results support a significant correlation of feeding preferences and foliar zinc concentrations, reducing herbivory by up to 20%. However, this was not the case for foliar nickel concentrations, though a tendency of some herbivores preferring low levels of nickel could be observed. This shows that the effect of accumulated heavy metals on herbivory depends largely on the type of metal and species of herbivore.

    ___

    Mary Beyer conducted this work at the institute for ecology and evolution at Salzburg University in the working group of Prof. Hans-Peter Comes.

    Jannes Höpke (Oldenburg University)

    Left: Jannes Hökpe pressing plants in the South Ukraine. Photo: Simon Pfanzelt Right: Veronica barrelieri subsp. crassifolia in its type locality (SW Romania). Photo: Jannes Höpke

    Jannes Höpke's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Carl von Ossietzky-Universität Oldenburg in the year 2019.

    Title:

    The intricate species boundary between Veronica spicata and V. orchidea (Plantaginaceae)

    For the fist time a systematical comparison regarding missing data in combination with missing allele-dosis-information for population genetical methods like PCA/PCoA and STRUCTURE was conducted. Moreover, genetical material from the type localities of V. barrelieri subsp. crassifolia und V. tzesnae was analysed for the first time in this study.

    The aim was to analyse the potentially hybridising species Veronica spicata and V. orchidea (Plantaginaceae) regarding their species boundary. Therefore, both species and morphologically similar species were analysed using Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS). The same question was already analysed by Bardy et al. (2011) using AFLP data but we were not able to completely confirm their results. To get a better understanding of how mixed ploidy-levels, the influence of missing data, and missing allele-dosis-information influence population genetical analyses, simulations and analyses of GBS data were conducted to reveal the reasons for the observed differences. Hereby a bug in the programme ipyrad was found out, the importance of paralogs was analysed and the difference between the coding of AFLP and diploidised SNP-Data was worked out

    ___

    Jannes Höpke conducted this work in the Institute for Biology and Environmental Sciences in the working group Biodiversity and Evolution of Plants of Prof. Dr. Dirk Albach

    see another image

    Felix Rehms (Münster University)

    Felix Rehms's Master thesis was awarded with the Prize for the Best Plant Science Master Thesis, which was carried out at Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster in the year 2019.

    Title:

    Development and application of genetically encoded fluorescent sensors for hypoxia investigation in plants

    Rehms documents the visualization of Ca2+-accumulation in energy-deprived cells and the subsequent calcium signal propagation in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings during prolonged oxygen restriction. He also started the development of genetically coded fluorescent oxygen sensors for use in-planta.

    With regards to the growing frequency of extreme precipitation and flooding events caused by global climate changes, tolerance to oxygen deprivation (hypoxia; assumedly the most severe plant stress caused by prolonged submergence) is rapidly gaining relevance as a trait in crop breeding, even though, as of yet, the underlying mechanisms are mostly unknown.

    To shed light on the role of second messengers in a plant’s perception and signal transduction of hypoxic conditions or the resulting energy crisis (caused by inhibition of aerobic respiration), genetically encoded fluorescent sensors of cytosolic Ca2+ and ATP concentration were employed for microscopic investigation of submerged Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in a spatio-temporal resolution.

    This way, he was able to record multiple waves of Ca2+-elevations, which were assumedly triggered by the collapse of energy upkeep and subsequent breakdown of active transport mechanisms that ensured the upkeep of steep ion gradients across membranes. Starting from the first energy depleted tissues or cells this wave spreads outwards and across the full seedling. The dynamics of these waves and comparisons to ATP monitoring in hypoxic seedlings suggests active signal propagation, rather than a universal increase caused exclusively by energy deprivation and passive ion leakage.

    Additionally, this work documented the beginning development of genetically coded fluorescent oxygen indicators. Such oxygen sensors can be ubiquitously expressed in all tissues and can be applied in-vivo to monitor ongoing developments. In contrast to chemical and physical oxygen measurements, this does not cause any additional plant stress. This makes the fluorescent sensors ideal for the investigation of the oxygen dependency of signals in hypoxic plants. On top of that, the sensors’ independence of plant adaption or developmental mechanisms may lead to the identification of hypoxic niches that were not implicated by expression of hypoxia marker genes.

    ___

    Felix Rehms conducted this work at the institute of Plant Biology and Biotechnology (IBBP) in the group of Prof. Dr. Jörg Kudla.

    2019

    In the year 2019 DBG's representatives at the following universities evaluated master theses in plant sciences. The following persons received the award (in alphabetical order):

    Helen Ballasus (Leipzig University)
    Species effects on temperature regulation mechanisms in the tree canopies at the Leipzig canopy crane
    more in the summary with images

    Mary Beyer (Paris-Lodron-Universität Salzburg)
    Is heavy metal hyperaccumulation in Noccaea caerulescens acting as a defence mechanism against herbivores?
    more in the summary

    Paul David Grünhofer (Universität Bonn)
    Formation and chemical composition of suberin in poplar roots
    more in the summary

    Natalie Hering (Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, KIT)
    In-situ hybridization in Salvia flowers and closely related Lamiaceae for the detection of developmental genes
    more in the summary

    Jannes Höpke (Carl von Ossietzky-Universität Oldenburg)
    The intricate species boundary between Veronica spicata and V. orchidea (Plantaginaceae)
    more in the summary with image

    Melanie Kastl (Universität zu Köln)
    Functional characterization of the Ustilago maydis organ-specific effectors: UMAG05306 and UMAG11060
    more in the summary

    Cathrin Manz Philipps-Universität Marburg)
    Diversity assessment of the ectomycorrhizal genus Russula in tropical montane forests in Panama
    more in the summary with image

    Erik Pischke (Rostock University in cooperation with Bayreuth University)
    The role of the leucine biosynthesis for Pb tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana
    more in the summary

    Felix Rehms (Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster)
    Development and application of genetically encoded fluorescent sensors for hypoxia investigation in plants
    more in the summary

    Nicola Schmidt (Technische Universität Dresden)
    Characterisation of the endogenous phytopararetrovirus beetEPRV3 in the sugar beet genome (Beta vulgaris), a new member of the florendoviruses within the Caulimoviridae family
    more in the summary with image

    Philipp Zamzow (Universität Bielefeld)
    Development and evaluation of selected orchards in the city of Bergkamen between 1990 and 2018
    more in the summary with images 

    11 Oct 2019

    44th DBG Newsletter

    Sorry, in German only

    Das älteste ökologische Freilandexperiment im Tropenwald, wie schlecht heimische Arabidopsis-Individuen auf die Klimakrise vorbereitet sind und ein neuer Biosensor zum Messen von Stressreaktionen sind Themen in den Forschungsnachrichten.

    Wo Ihre Stimme als Wissenschaftlerin oder Wissenschaftler erwünscht wird, an welchen Stellen sich die DBG für die Pflanzenforschung und die Wissenschaft eingesetzt hat und welche Entscheidungen bei unserer Mitgliederversammlung getroffen wurden, steht in den beiden darauffolgenden Rubriken. Außerdem berichten wir von der Präsidiumswahl der DBG und über die Wahlergebnisse von zwei unserer sechs Sektionen.

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    11 Oct 2019

    44th DBG Newsletter

    Sorry, in German only

    Das älteste ökologische Freilandexperiment im Tropenwald, wie schlecht heimische Arabidopsis-Individuen auf die Klimakrise vorbereitet sind und ein neuer Biosensor zum Messen von Stressreaktionen sind Themen in den Forschungsnachrichten.

    Wo Ihre Stimme als Wissenschaftlerin oder Wissenschaftler erwünscht wird, an welchen Stellen sich die DBG für die Pflanzenforschung und die Wissenschaft eingesetzt hat und welche Entscheidungen bei unserer Mitgliederversammlung getroffen wurden, steht in den beiden darauffolgenden Rubriken. Außerdem berichten wir von der Präsidiumswahl der DBG und über die Wahlergebnisse von zwei unserer sechs Sektionen.

    to 44th Newsletter (member's LogIn necessary)

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    10 Oct 2019

    Botanikertagung: Plant Science is Essential for our Future

    Conference chair Prof. Dr. Birgit Piechulla wore the conference t-shirt displaying the conference motto Plant Science for our Future. Photo: Thomas Rahr

    More than 400 plant scientists from more than 25 countries came together in September in Rostock, Germany, to exchange and discuss latest research results. Conference chair Prof. Dr. Birgit Piechulla reports about the diversity of plant science disciplines by summarizing the keynote lectures.

    Sorry, in German only

    Mehr als 400 Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler aus mehr als zwei Duzend Ländern kamen im September zur Botanikertagung zusammen, um die jüngsten Forschungsergebnisse zu diskutieren. Anhand der Plenarvorträge stellt Tagungspräsidentin, Prof. Dr. Birgit Piechulla, die Vielfalt der pflanzenwissenschaftlichen Disziplinen heraus, die in Rostock besonderes Augenmerk verdienen. Die rasante Entwicklung neuer Züchtungsmethoden u.a. mit CRISPR thematisierte der öffentliche Abendvortrag an der Universität, die dieses Jahr ihre 600-Jahrfeier beging.

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    Contact

    Speakers

    Prof. Dr. Ute Wittstock
    TU Braunschweig
    Institut für Pharmazeutische Biologie
    Mendelssohnstrasse 1
    D-38106 Braunschweig
    Germany
    Phone: +49 (0)531 391 5681
    E-Mail: u.wittstock[at]tu-braunschweig.de 
    Web: http://134.169.98.131/ipb/mitarbeiter/mitarbeiter_detail_fiona.asp?id=4&cname=

    Prof. Dr. Maike Petersen
    Institut für Pharmazeutische Biologie und Biotechnologie
    Philipps-Universität Marburg
    Deutschhausstraße 17A
    35037 Marburg
    Germany
    Phone: ++49-(0)6421 2825821
    E-Mail: petersen[at]uni-marburg.de
    Maike Petersen group's website

    Board (2020 - 2022)

    The board of trustees of the German Society for Plant Sciences (Deutsche Botanische Gesellschaft, DBG) consists of the executive committee and seven additional board members. The executive committee and two members of the board of trustees are elected by the general assembly for a period of two years. The other five members of the board of trustees are the chairpersons of the five sections of the German Society for Plant Sciences.

    Executive Board (2020 - 2022)

    President: Prof. Dr. Andreas Weber

    Treasurer: Prof. Dr. Raimund Tenhaken

    Secretary General: Prof. Dr. Caroline Müller

    Secretary: Dr. Thomas Janßen

    Extended Board (2020 - 2022)

    Elected member of the Extended Board: Prof. Dr. Andreas Meyer

    Elected member of the Extended Board: Prof. Dr. Iris Finkemeier

    Speaker of the Section Plant Physiology and Molecular Biology: Prof. Dr. Stefan Rensing

    Speaker of the Section Biodiversity and Evolution: Prof. Dr. Dirk Albach

    Speaker of the Section Phycology: Prof. Dr. Maria Mittag

    Speaker of the Section Secondary Plant Constituents and Natural Products: Prof. Dr. Ute Wittstock

    Speaker of the Section Applied Botany: Prof. Dr. Dirk Selmar

     

    Substitute

    Substitute Member (advisory support): Speaker of the Section for Interaction (former Section of Mykology and Lichenology) Prof. Dr. Dominik Begerow

    28 Sep 2019

    Images of the Botanikertagung

    All images of the conference. Photos: Thomas Rahr et al.

    The images of our International Plant Science Conference in Rostock with more than 420 participants from 27 countries are now available in the intranet. Many thanks to photographer Thomas Rahr and all other photographers!

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    28 Sep 2019

    Images of the Botanikertagung

    All images of the conference. Photos: Thomas Rahr et al.

    The images of our International Plant Science Confrence in Rostock with more than 420 participants from 27 countries are now available in the intranet. Many thanks to photographer Thomas Rahr and all other photographers!

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    27 Sep 2019

    Thanks to president of the Wilhelm Pfeffer Foundation

    Board member Prof. Dr. Birgit Piechulla handed over the present to Prof. Dr. Christian Wilhelm. Photo: DBG

    Sorry, in German only

    Nachdem er im Frühjahr in Ruhestand gegangen war, trat nach 12 Jahren der Präsident der DBG-eigenen Wilhelm Pfeffer-Stiftung, Prof. Dr. Christian Wilhelm, von diesem Amt zurück. Während der Botanikertagung im September in Rostock, dankte DBG-Präsident Prof. Dr. Karl-Josef Dietz seinem Kollegen Wilhelm für dessen ehrenamtliche Präsidentschaft über so viele Jahre und sein Engagement für den wissenschaftlichen Nachwuchs. Tagungspräsidentin Prof. Dr. Birgit Piechulla überreichte ein Präsent. Das Präsidium der Wilhelm Pfeffer-Stiftung entscheidet unter anderem alle zwei Jahre über die Vergabe des Wilhelm Pfeffer-Preises und in den dazwischen liegenden Jahren über die Vergabe des Preises für die Beste Veröffentlichung. Als neuer Präsident der Stiftung wurde Prof. Dr. Severin Sasso gewählt, der seit diesem Frühling Professor für Pflanzenphysiologie an der Universität Leipzig ist.

    27 Sep 2019

    No sustainability without plants and plant science

    Cover of the conference booklet. Photo: Thomas Rahr, Uni Rostock

    DBG's president Prof. Dr. Karl-Josef Dietz emphasized the importance of plant science for basic needs of humankind and our society. There is "no sustainability without plants", he states in his welcome address on the opening of the International Plant Science Conference, Botanikertagung, in Rostock, on 16th September, which was attended by more than 420 participants from 27 countries. “If grown under environmentally balanced conditions, plants are the most sustainable production system on earth.” Moreover, plant science can contribute to 8 out of the 17 sustainable development goals (called SDGs) of the United Nations. For example, weather and stress-resistant crop plants are needed to reach the goal of zero hunger, or plants cleaning toxins out of water, or plants for sustainable biomass production, etc. This dependency stresses how important plant science is for our future.

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    Day 1 and Horst Wiehe Award

    Images from the day 1 of the conference and Horst Wiehe Award
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    Nagoya Workshop

    Members of on the podium of the workshop

     

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    Open evening Lecture

    Ulla Bonas (Halle an der Saale): Neue molekulare Techniken in der Pflanzenzüchtung

     

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    Day 2 and Wilhelm Pfeffer Award

    Images of the 2nd day and Wilhelm Pfeffer Award

     

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    Section Plant Physiology and Molecular Biology

    Stefan Rensing and Andrea Bräutigam were elected to be the new Section's speakers

     

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    Day 3 and Eduard Strasburger Award

    Images of the 3rd day of the Conference and Eduard Strasburger Award

     

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    DBG's member assembly

    Images from the assembly

     

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    Poster Session (en)

    Poster Session on Wednesday, 18th September 2019

     

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    Social Evening

    Festive Dinner at Kurhaus Warnemünde

     

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    Poster Awards

    Awarding ceremony for the authors of best conference posters

     

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    Congress Impressions

    More than 420 participants from 27 countries came to the Botanikertagung 2019 taking place at Ulmen campus of Rostock University.

     

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    26 Sep 2019

    Awards for best science posters

    Awardees of the poster prizes and of Nicon's Poster Prize 2019. Photo: Thomas Rahr

    From the more than 190 posters presented at Botanikertagung 2019 in Rostock, Germany, participants chose several as best papers. The awarded presenters received a document as well as 137 Euros each since the German Society for Plant Sciences (DBG) today was 137 years old.

    Awarded young scientists and their poster titles (pdf file)

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    Prof. em. Dr. Heinz Rennenberg (*1949); Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg

    Heinz Rennenberg, honorary member of the Society since 2019. Photo: private

    Sorry in German only

    Heinz Rennenberg erbrachte herausragende wissenschaftliche Pionierleistungen zum Schwefel-Stoffwechsel der Pflanzen, zum Austausch klimarelevanter Spurengase wie etwa Methan zwischen Bio- und Atmosphäre sowie in Physiologie, Ökophysiologie und Molekularbiologie der Bäume. Über viele Jahre war er darüber hinaus Editor in Chief unserer Fachzeitschrift Plant Biology sowie Präsident der Federation of European Societies of Plant Biology (FESPB) und engagierte sich in unserer Sektion Pflanzenphysiologie und Molekularbiologie. Zudem ist er Mitglied der Nationalen Akademie der Wissenschaften Leopoldina. In der Laudatio zählen die vier antragstellenden Pflanzenwissenschaftler*innen weitere Ergebnisse von Rennenbergs Engagement und wissenschaftlichen Leistungen heraus. 

    Ganze Laudatio lesen (pdf-Datei)

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    25 Sep 2019

    Prof. Dr. Heinz Rennenberg new honorary member

    DBG's president Prof. Dr. Karl-Josef Dietz, new honorary member Prof. em. Dr. Heinz Rennenberg and giving the laudatory speech Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Hartmut Lichtenthaler (f.l.t.r.). Photo: DBG

    The member assembly at the Botanikertagung in Rostock, Germany, unanimously decided that Prof. Dr. Heinz Rennenberg will become our new honorary member.

    Angeregt hatten dies die vier Pflanzenwissenschaftler*innen Prof. Dr. Robert Hänsch (Braunschweig), Prof.in Dr. Cornelia Herschbach (Freiburg), Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Hartmut Lichtenthaler (Karlsruhe) und Prof.in Dr. Christiane Werner (Freiburg). Wie Ehrengast Lichtenthaler in der Laudatio (pdf-Datei) herausstellte, könne Rennenberg nicht nur auf ein international hoch anerkanntes wissenschaftliches Werk mit vielen internationalen Kooperationen schauen, sondern auch auf ein erfolgreiches, 16 jähriges Wirken als Editor-in-Chief unserer Fachzeitschrift Plant Biology. Er engagierte sich als Präsident für die Federation of European Societies of Plant Biology (FESPB) und für unsere Sektion Pflanzenphysiologie und Molekularbiologie in der DBG und für die Deutsche Botanik insgesamt.

    weitere Aufnahme

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    24 Sep 2019

    Thanks to president Prof. Dr. Karl-Josef Dietz

    President Prof. Dr. Karl-Josef Dietz, Conference chair, Prof. Dr. Birgit Piechulla and DBG's General Secretary, Prof. Dr. Caroline Müller (von links). Photo: DBG

    In the name of the whole board, General Secretary Prof. Dr. Caroline Müller thanked our current president, Prof. Dr. Karl-Josef Dietz from Bielefeld University, for his successes and his cooperative form in leading our society through the last eight years. Dietz received another present from conference chair, Prof. Dr. Birgit Piechulla, who thanked Dietz for the fruitful and enjoyable collaboration in the preparation of this year's Botanikertagung, International Plant Science Conference.

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    23 Sep 2019

    New president-elect and new board member

    Prof. Dr. Andreas Meyer (left) and the new president-elect, Prof. Dr. Andreas Weber. Photos: private

    On 18th September, Prof. Dr. Andreas Weber from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU); Germany, was elected unanimously in the General Assembly during the Botanikertagung to be DBG's new president. The current president, Prof. Dr. Karl-Josef Dietz from Bielefeld University, who holds this position for eight years now, did not stand for re-election. Weber, who could not make it to the Member Assembly, thanked Prof. Dietz for his outstanding work and his exemplary participatory leadership via Twitter. Weber, who will take over the office in January, is speaker of CEPLAS (Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences), director of Düsseldorf's Centre for Synthetic Biology and elected member in the Leopoldina German National Academy of Sciences (Deutsche Akademie der Naturforscher).
    Prof. Dr. Andreas Meyer, chair for Chemical Signalling at INRES of Bonn University was also unanimously elected as new board member. He follows Prof Dr. Brigit Piechulla and will be chair of the next DBG’S International Plant Science Conference (Botanikertagung) in Germany, that will take place from 29th August until 2nd September 2021 in Bonn, Germany. All other members of the DBG board were reelected.

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    09 Sep 2019

    Awards for four Exceptional Plant Scientists

    The awarded scientists (counter clockwise starting top left): Dr. Constantin Mario Zohner, Dr. Eva-Sophie Wallner, Dr. Moisés Expósito Alonso and Dr. Jessica Lee Erickson. Photos: Jaimie Crowther, Jörg Abendroth, Tobias Jung, and Carolin Alfs

    How climate change influences growing seasons length in woody plants and survival of flowers, the substances that influence shape changes of plastids, and the proteins that spur phloem differentiation are in the research focus of the four plant scientists who will receive the science prices of the German Society for Plant Sciences (DBG) this year. Dr. Constantin Mario Zohner, Dr. Jessica Lee Erickson, Dr. Moisés Expósito Alonso and Dr. Eva-Sophie Wallner will get their awards during the Botanikertagung, the International Plant Science Conference in Rostock, Germany. From 16th to 18th September, the four will present their research results to the more than 420 conference participants.

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    09 Sep 2019

    Awards for four Exceptional Plant Scientists

    Use of images and copyrights

    Usage of the following images is permitted for reporting this year’s science awards from DBG and the scientific results of the four awardees. Please acknowledge the photographers and obey copyright issues.

    09 Sep 2019

    Awards for four Exceptional Plant Scientists

    The awarded scientists (counter clockwise starting top left): Dr. Constantin Mario Zohner, Dr. Eva-Sophie Wallner, Dr. Moisés Expósito Alonso and Dr. Jessica Lee Erickson. Photos: Jaimie Crowther, Jörg Abendroth, Tobias Jung, and Carolin Alfs

    How climate change influences growing seasons length in woody plants and survival of flowers, the substances that influence shape changes of plastids, and the proteins that spur phloem differentiation are in the research focus of the four plant scientists who will receive the science prices of the German Society for Plant Sciences (DBG) this year. Dr. Constantin Mario Zohner, Dr. Jessica Lee Erickson, Dr. Moisés Expósito Alonso and Dr. Eva-Sophie Wallner will get their awards during the Botanikertagung, the International Plant Science Conference in Rostock, Germany. From 16th to 18th September, the four will present their research results to the more than 420 conference participants.

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