Articles for category Sektionen


Sections

New Sections's speaker elected

Our Section for Interactions has elected Dr. Sophie de Vries to be the new Speaker of the Section during our member assembly in Bonn during the Botanik-Tagung, International Conference of the German Society for Plant Sciences, on 30th August 2022. Our former speaker, Professor Dominik Begerow will be our new deputy speaker.

Sections · Event

Symposium at DGfM's meeting

Our Section will organise a scientific symposium during the next meeting of the Deutschen Gesellschaft für Mykologie (DGfM) at Blaubeuren, Germany, on 6th and 7th October 2021. Section speaker Prof. Dr. Dominik Begerow welcomes the international guests:

  • Dr. M. Cathy Aime, Purdue University, USA;
  • Dr J. Jennifer Luangsaard, BIOTEC, Thailand;
  • Prof. Dr. Pedro Crous, WFBI, Utrecht, Netherlands;
  • Dr. Miroslav Kolařík, Czech Academy of Science, Czech Republic;
  • Prof. Dr. Cobus Visagie, FABI, Pretoria, South Africa.

Registrations until 30th April can profit from the early bird rate. Updates shortly at DGfM's website

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Sections

Nachruf: Professor Dr. Reinhard Lieberei (1948 - 2019)

Prof. Dr. Reinhard Lieberei. Foto: privat.

Sorry, in German only

Als international renommierter Wissenschaftler war Reinhard Lieberei stets in vorderster Front an unzähligen Forschungsprojekten der Angewandten Botanik beteiligt. Für die meisten Mitglieder der Deutschen Botanischen Gesellschaft ist die Forschung an tropischen Nutzpflanzen unverrückbar mit dem Namen Reinhard Lieberei verbunden. Ob es um die Optimierung der Kakaofermentation ging, die Bekämpfung von Krankheiten des Kautschukbaumes oder die Etablierung nachhaltiger Anbaumethoden in Südamerika - Lieberei prägte durch seine Innovation und Begeisterung viele Forschungsprojekte zu tropischen Nutzpflanzen. Sein beeindruckendes Wissen über diese angewandten Forschungsfelder ist in sein Lehrbuch „Nutzpflanzen“ eingeflossen, das er gemeinsam mit Christoph Reisdorff erstellt hat, einem seiner vielen wissenschaftlichen Schüler. Prof. Dr. Dirk Selmar schildert in seinem Nachruf auch Liebereis Engagement in der Vereinigung für Angewandte Botanik und in der Sektion für Angewandte Botanik in der DBG.

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News-Timeline · Press release · Sections

Alga of the year 2017: Blue-Green Rock Dweller – ancient and still a pioneer

Cross fractured Beacon sandstone from Antarctica exposing the habitat of the blue-green rock dweller (Chroococcidiopsis) as a green band underneath the surface of the rock (arrows). Photo: Burkhard Büdel, TU Kaiserslautern

The algal researchers of the DBG nominated the Blue-Green Rock Dweller Chroococcidiopsis for the alga of the year 2017. The single celled organism lives inside rocks and lichens, survives extreme climatic conditions and makes hostile environments accessible – today and most likely thousands of millions of years ago as well. While doing so, it paved the way for plants and animals. The blue-green rock dweller, belonging to the cyanobacteria lives like all algae, from sunlight, and is of great interest to ecologists, biotechnologists, and desert- and space researchers. It is the favorite research subject of Prof. Dr. Burkhard Büdel from the University of Kaiserslautern, who has been investigating it for more than 30 years. He is a member of the Phycology Section of the German Society for Plant Sciences, DBG, in which the algal researches are organized and who nominate this year an alga of the year for the tenth time this year.

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DBG · Sections

Section Meeting 2016

The workshop for postgraduates of the Section Natural Products in the DBG took place in Parkhotel Schloss Meisdorf, near Falkenstein in Saxony-Anhalt, from 11th to 13th September 2016. Entitled „Biology of Small Molecule Natural Products” the event brought together young scientists who investigate secondary plant constituents and natural products. It was organized by PD Dr. Hans-Peter Mock from IPK Gatersleben from Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research.

News-Timeline · Press release · Sections

Sea Ice Alga Melosira arctica – winner or loser of climate change?

Many unicellular Melosira arctica are coated from jellyies are hanging under an ice floe. Foto und ©: Julian Gutt, AWI

One of the most important microalgal species from the Arctic Ocean, Melosira arctica, has been nominated “Alga of the Year” by the German Phycology Section of the DBG. Scientists will use Melosira as a model to understand consequences of climate change. “Currently no one can foresee whether Melosira will benefit or suffer from the melting of sea ice, and nobody knows why it is so productive under such hostile conditions,” says biologist Klaus Valentin from the Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI). He is a Member of the Phycological Section within the Germany Botanical Society, which selected Melosira as Alga of the year 2016.

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Press release · Sections

The Sea Lettuce Ulva only gets in shape with the right bacteria

The genus Ulva grows as a tube or a ‘lettuce’ flat, sheet-like blade, as shown for these species collected at the Portuguese coast. The interactions between the juvenile algae and bacteria can be studied under controlled conditions in the laboratory (right). Photos and © Thomas Wichard, University Jena

Ulva, a sea lettuce found in all oceans of the world, became ‘Alga of the Year 2015’. This marine green alga either grows in form of ribbons or of blades but only if the right bacteria induce certain developmental programs. How the alga ensures this is described on the Section's website.

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Press release · Sections

Chlamydomonas reinhardtii - a fast swimmer serves as a model organism

The video shows the helical movements of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in the light microscope. Related to its body index C. reinhardtii swims approx. 12 times faster than the world record holder in 50-m breast-stroke swimming.

Phycologists of the Botanical Society of Germany have selected Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as alga of the year 2014. This unicellular green alga is distributed throughout the world, is able to sense light, is a fast swimmer and is highly appreciated by algal and plant researchers as well as medical scientists as a model organism. Chlamydomonas even provides the basis for the establishment of novel scientific areas in neurobiology and medicine, such as optogenetics where genetically modified cells are applied as ‘light switches’. The Phycology Section introduces the model organism on its website.

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Actualia (engl.) · Sections

Sektion ändert ihren Namen und lädt alle Interaktionsforscher ein

Sorry - in German only

Die Mitgliederversammlung der Sektion Mykologie und Lichenologie beschloss auf ihrer Mitgliederversammlung am 1.10.2013 ihren Namen in "Sektion für Interaktionen zu ändern. Diskutiert wurde der Namenswechsel schon seit Mai und damit vor dem Treffen auf der Botanikertagung in Tübingen (vgl: Actualia-Bericht 16.5.2013). Insbesondere wurde über den Vorschlag „Sektion für Pilz-Pflanz-Interaktion“ während der Mitgliederversammlung debattiert und eine Ausweitung in „Sektion für Interaktionen“ – um auch andere Interkationen einzuschließen – angedacht. Deshalb führt die Sektion für die nächsten zwei Jahre einen Doppelnamen „Sektion für Interaktionen (ehemals Sektion Mykologie und Lichenologie)“. Der Sprecher der Sektion, Prof. Dr. Dominik Begerow, lädt alle an Interaktionen zwischen Pflanzen und anderen Organismen forschenden Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler ein, sich der Sektion anzuschließen und das nächste Sektionstreffen aktiv mitzugestalten. Über Ihre Vorschläge zur Themenfindung und weitere Anregungen freut sich der Sprecher im Namen aller Sektionsmitglieder. E-Mail: dominik.begerow[at]rub.de

Actualia (engl.) · Sections

Umbenennung der Sektion Mykologie und Lichenologie

Interaktionen zwischen Pilzen und Pflanzen und ihren Forschern

Sorry - in German only

Die Sektion "Mykologie und Lichenologie" diskutiert derzeit darüber, den Namen der Sektion in "Pilz-Pflanze Interaktionen" umzubenennen, um den Forschungsschwerpunkten innerhalb der DBG Rechnung zu tragen. Der Sprecher der Sektion, Prof. Dr. Dominik Begerow, lädt dazu ein, an der Versammlung der Sektion während der Botanikertagung teilzunehmen, während der er die weiteren Aktivitäten der Sektion vorstellen, diskutieren und mit allen Interessierten abstimmen möchte. Welchen Hintergrund dies hat und welche neuen Aktivitäten in der Sektion durch Ihr Kommen angestoßen werden können, schildert Begerow in einem kurzen Artikel und freut sich auf Ihr Kommen, Ihr Feedback und Ihre Anregungen.

Lesen Sie die Begründung des Sprechers, Professor Dr. Dominik Begerow

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Press release · Sections

Alga of the year 2013: The microalga Lingulodinium polyedrum illuminates the sea

Blue bioluminescence caused by blooms of Lingulodinium polyedrum in surface waters near San Diego on the Californian coast in 2011. Photo: With kind permission by Christopher J. Wills, University of California , San Diego

Phycologists have chosen a new alga of the year: the unicellular alga Lingulodinium polyedrum. This dinoflagellate has an armoured plate and two flagella and fascinates not only scientists but also seafarers and beach walkers as is capable of illuminating the sea at night with a bluish light. Algal scientists who are organized in the German Phycological Section of the German Botanical Society want to honour this special algal species. Dr Mona Hoppenrath from the German Centre for Marine Biodiversity (DZMB) at the marine section of the Senckenberg Institute explains this fascinating feature: the species has the ability to auto-luminesce, possesses a distinct diurnal rhythm and can be used as a sensor for water quality.

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Press release · Sections

Algal of the year: The Stoneworts (Chara species) – pioneers and keystone species under threat

The stonewort Chara horrida had disappeared from German waters in 1980 but has now been rediscovered by algal researchers in the Bodden Waters off the Baltic island of Hiddensee . The alga which can be up to 40 cm in length has so many spines that its main axis is hardly visible (see image below) which has resulted in its descriptive German common name ‘struppig’ which means ‘bristly’ or ‘rugged’. Photo: © Sven Dahlke, Biologische Station Hiddensee, Germany.

Stoneworts belonging to the genus Chara are algae of the year 2012. They were selected by algal researchers of the Phycology Section of the German Botanical Society because members of this genus represent so many different algal life strategies. According to algal expert Dr Irmgard Blindow from the Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, some Chara species are able to conquer new aquatic habitats as ‘pioneers’ whilst others exhibit very specific growth requirements, and once having colonised an area, can shape an ecosystem. The decision to declare Chara ‘Algae of the year’ acknowledges the importance of this group of algae which comprises 20 native species included in the Red List of threatened species.

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Press release · Sections

Batrachospermum indicates clear waters

Am Zentralfaden entspringen in regelmäßigen Abständen dicht gedrängte Wirtel, die der Froschlaichalge, Batrachospermum, ein perlschnurartiges Aussehen verleihen. Sie bestehen aus verzweigten Zellfäden. Mikroskopische Aufnahme: Dr. Johanna Knappe, Philipps-Universität Marburg)

Sorry, in Germnan only

Froschlaichalgen der Gattung Batrachospermum werden immer rarer, da ihr Lebensraum schwindet. Die Algenexperten der Sektion Phykologie stellen die Alge vor und möchten auf diese gefährdete Pflanze unserer heimischen Gewässer aufmerksam machen.

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Press release · Sections

Alga of the year 2009: Emiliania huxleyi – an algal dwarf which impacts on the global climate

Algal bloom off the coast of Iceland , documented by NASA. The turquoise traces in the water suggest that billions of Emiliania huxleyi are present in the phytoplankton. Photo: NASA/GSFC, MODIS Rapid Response

Algal researchers of the German Botanical Society have chosen Emiliania huxleyi as ‘alga of the year‘ to highlight its importance as a global key organism.

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Press release · Sections

Micrasterias immortal but in the Red Data Book for endangered species

Micrasterias furcata has a diameter of only 0.2 millimeters and occurs in boggy areas. It is classified as ‘endangered’ according to the Red Data Book of 2008. Since it was first discovered and described by scientists it has been observed only in three locations in Germany. The species is classified as ‘near threatened’ in Austria. (Image: Dr. Monika Engels, desmid algal collection, University of Hamburg)

Algal researchers of the Phycology Section of the German Botanical Society have chosen the desmid Micrasterias as ‘Alga of the Year 2008’. Micrasterias, the name derived from Greek meaning ‘little star’, is a highly threatened, but species-rich and morphologically extremely diverse, genus of green algae. They entirely depend on the presence of unspoilt freshwater bodies for their existence.

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Press release · Sections

Kelp Laminaria nominated "Alga of the year 2007"

During low water, the Oar Weed may be emersed (Laminaria digitata), like here, on the shores of Helgoland . Individual algae may grow to four metres in length. Clearly visible on the photograph is the finger-like blade after which it is named. The base of the blade is wedge-shaped, which distinguishes it from Laminaria hyperborea with its heart-shaped base of the blade. (Photo: Annekatrin Enge, Biological Institute Helgoland of the Alfred-Wegener-Institute)

Members of the Phycology Section of the German Botanical Society who conduct research on algae nominate the seaweed Laminaria as ‘Alga of the year’: the kelp Laminaria can reach lengths of several metres. It forms, together with other macroalgal species, large underwater forests in the sea (so-called ‘kelp forests’). Kelps contain alginic acid which has several applications as stabilising agents in many food and cosmetic products. In contrast to other plants, kelps grow mainly in winter when sunlight is sparse. Algae take up the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide and are the most important oxygen producers of the world.

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DBG · Sections

About us

The section Natural Products brings together scientists across generations who are interested in various aspects of natural products research ranging from biosynthesis over physiological and ecological function and evolution to biotechnological production of plant natural products. The sections furthers scientific exchange between its members and supports early career scientists.

Activities

Members of the section receive information about activities of the section, section meetings, workshops and relevant job announcements via Email. Our early career researches administrate a virtual forum which is meant to improve community outreach for scientific questions and ideas. Regarding any questions to the forum, feel free to contact Christoph Kentrath. You are welcome to signup through this link: https://discord.gg/bZKeWQ8dHF.

Scientific meetings

The section Natural Products meets every second year (alternating with with the International Conference of the German Society for Plant Sciences, Botaniktagung) for a symposium. These meetings provide a nice platform for scientific exchange and are especially devoted to early career scientists. PhD students and postdocs have the opportunity to present their work, to discuss it in an informal atmosphere and to build their scientific network. The last workshop for early career researchers took place in Bad Endbach from 13 to 15 October 2023 (read meeting report). The next workshop of this kind is planned for 2025.

Membership

Members pay a yearly fee of 10 €. Members of our head organisation, Deutsche Botanische Gesellschaft (DBG), can become a member of our section through the DBG website.

Please contact the section's speakers if you have questions, suggestions or requests.