Reccomended
24. Jan 2023 · Plant Biology · DBG

Review: Rice anther tapetum - a vital reproductive cell layer for sporopollenin biosynthesis and pollen exine patterning

[Translate to Englisch:] Summary of the regulation of tapetum and pollen formation, focused on the role of AT-Hook DNA binding proteins in tapetal and exine patterning

Findings on rice tapetum development, including genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic studies are reviewed by the authors Tariq, Yaseen, Xu, Rehman, Bibi and Uzair. They also describe tapetal programmed cell death (PCD), sporopollenin biosynthesis, ROS activity for tapetum
function and its role in male reproductive development. They summarize the role of the tapetum in male fertility using rice as a model system, and provide information that can be applied in rice hybridization and that of other major crops.

Read whole paper open access in our scientific journal Plant Biology (2022). DOI: 10.1111/plb.13485

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

20. Jan 2023 · Plant Biology · DBG

Review: Plant water uptake modelling - added value of cross-disciplinary approaches

[Translate to Englisch:] Factors influencing water uptake and complementary interdisciplinary hybrid models of plant water uptake

The authors Dubbert, Couvreur, Kübert, and Werner summarize how interdisciplinary hybrid plant water uptake models add the value of a broader conceptual view of soil-plant feedbacks of water, nutrient and carbon cycling. The main goal is to highlight how the four dominant model approaches can be and have been used to create interdisciplinary hybrid models enabling a holistic system understanding that also embeds plant water uptake plasticity into a broader conceptual view of soil–plant feedbacks of water, nutrient and carbon cycling, or reflects observed drought responses of plant–soil feedbacks and their dynamics under, that is, drought.

Read whole paper open access in our scientific journal Plant Biology 25 (2021) 32–42. DOI: 10.1111/plb.13478.

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

11. Nov 2022 · Plant Biology · DBG

Review: Grass species with smoke-released seed dormancy: A response to climate and fire regime but not photosynthetic pathway

Among worldwide grass species, four types of smoke-assisted seed dormancy release can be recognized, based on % with C4 photosynthesis, vegetation type, rainfall seasonality, and type and frequency of fire

In the review author Lamont summarizes the worldwide literature for reports on germination responses among grasses, whose photosynthetic pathway was known, to treatment by smoke and obtained information for 217 species and 126 genera. Thus, even though C3 and C4 grasses are equally capable of expressing smoke sensitivity, their response depends on the region’s climate and fire regime that also dictate which photosynthetic pathway dominates.

Read whole paper in our scientific journal Plant Biology DOI: 10.1111/plb.13479

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

11. Nov 2022 · Plant Biology · DBG

Viewpoint: Is a spice missing from the recipe? The intra-cellular localization of vanillin biosynthesis needs further investigations

[Translate to Englisch:] The biosynthesis of the flavor compound Vanillin is still controversial; specifically the role of the last enzyme of the pathway, vanillin synthase

Authors Diamond, Barnabé and Desgagné-Penix raise questions on the interpretation of data obtained from the technique used and on the true localization of the biosynthetic enzymes in V. planifolia. They discuss the findings surrounding the cellular-localization and activity of enzymes of vanillin biosynthesis. This will help to further understand the pathway and urge for additional research study to resolve the current debate in the biosynthesis of the most popular flavor compound in the world.

Read whole viewpoint in our scientific journal Plant Biology DOI: 10.1111/plb.13465

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

11. Nov 2022 · Plant Biology · DBG

Review: Possible mechanisms underlying the compensation effect upon the suppression of AOX1a

Decreased relative amounts of reduced ascorbate at stable reactive-oxygen-species (ROS) levels owing to compensation in AOX-suppressed plants might indicate stress development

Author Garmash in the review with the title "Suppression of mitochondrial alternative oxidase can result in upregulation of the ROS scavenging network: some possible mechanisms underlying the compensation effect" proposes that the decrease in the relative amount of reduced ascorbate at stable ROS levels as a result of compensation in AOX1a-suppressed plants is a sign of stress development.

Read whole paper in our scientific journal Plant Biology DOI: 10.1111/plb.13477

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

09. Nov 2022 · Plant Biology · DBG

Review: How magnetic fields affect plants

The magnetic field interacts with plants and accelerates metabolism through signaling pathways, which results in a higher germination rate, and improved growth and production (click to enlarge)

In their paper "Growth, physiological, biochemical and molecular changes in plants induced by magnetic fields" the authors Hafeez, Zahra, Ahmad et al. describe the effects of altering magnetic field conditions (higher or lower values than the Earth’s geomagnetic field) on physiological and biochemical processes of plants: Magnetic field application play a role in changing several physiological processes and could be a potential affordable, reusable and safe practice for enhancing crop productivity by changing physiological and biochemical processes.

Read whole paper in our scientific journal Plant Biology DOI: 10.1111/plb.13459

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

17. Oct 2022 · Plant Biology · DBG

Review: Roadmap to improve photosynthetic efficiency in staple crops

Roadmap to imporve photosynthetic efficiency in staple crops. (click to enlarge)

Based on the current experimental advances authors Pradhan, Panda, Bishi, et al. in their review "Progress and prospects of C4 trait engineering in plants" summarize novel biotechnological crop improvement strategies that might help to incorporate C4 photosynthetic traits into C3 crops for sustaining food, fiber and fuel production around the globe. They not only report on successes but also on failures and highlight the pros and cons of using rice as a model plant for short-, medium- and long-term goals of genetic engineering.

Read whole paper in our scientific journal Plant Biology open access. DOI: 10.1111/plb.13446

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

14. Oct 2022 · Plant Biology · DBG

Review: How arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affect the accumulation of secondary metabolites of Traditional Chinese medicinal plants

Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on secondary metabolites in Traditional Chinese medicine and the mechanism of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi regulating the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites

In their review "Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: Effects on secondary metabolite accumulation of traditional Chinese medicines", the authors Ran, Ding, Cao et al. discuss the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on secondary metabolites in Traditional Chinese medicine and the mechanism of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi regulating the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. The results could be used to provide new ideas and methods for improving the quality of Traditional Chinese medicine.

Read whole paper in our scientific journal Plant Biology open access. DOI: 10.1111/plb.13449

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

11. Oct 2022 · Plant Biology · DBG

Review: physiological mechanisms how selenium improves heavy metal stress tolerance in plants

[Translate to Englisch:] Selenium improves the tolerance to heavy metal stress of plants in several ways.

In their review "Advances in physiological mechanisms of selenium to improve heavy metal stress tolerance in plants" the authors Lai, Yang, Rao et al. summarize several antagonistic effects of selenium on heavy metal stressors such as cadmium and mercury. The review helps to comprehensively understand the physiological mechanism of selenium in plant tolerance to heavy metal stress of plants, and provides theoretical support for the practical application of selenium in environmental remediation and agricultural development.

Read whole review in our scientific journal Plant Biology open access. DOI: 10.1111/plb.13435

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

22. Sep 2022 · Plant Biology · DBG

How the 2018 hot drought brings Pinus sylvestris to a tipping point and whether the ecosystem recovers

The 2018 hot drought severely impaired hydraulic functionality in a Scots Pine forest, causing accelerated tree mortality rates, which ultimately led to a tipping point for the ecosystem.

In their research paper "Central European 2018 hot drought shifts scots pine forest to its tipping point" published in July 2022 authors Haberstroh et al. analyse the severe negative impacts of the hot drought in 2018 on a Pinus sylvestris forests in southwest Germany. The co-occurrence of unfavourable site-specific conditions with recurrent severe droughts resulted in accelerated mortality. Thus, the 2018 hot drought pushed the P. sylvestris stand towards its tipping point, with a subsequent vegetation shift to a broadleaf-dominated forest. To draw this conclusions the authors had analysed needle water potential, carbon assimilation and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. The impact and recovery were assessed as ecosystem carbon exchange, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from satellite data and tree mortality data.

Read whole open access paper in our scientific journal Plant Biology (2022). DOI: 10.1111/plb.13455

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

14. Sep 2022 · Plant Biology · DBG

How isoprenoid emission capacities vary in response to ecophysiological and environmental controls in Amazonian ecosystems

Amazonian tree species emit less isoprene but more larger isoprenoids in response to abiotic stress.

From the data measured and published in their paper "Seasonal shifts in isoprenoid emission composition from three hyperdominant tree species in central Amazonia" Gomes Alves and the 12 other authors suggest that emission composition shifts are part of a plastic response to increasing abiotic stress (e.g. heat and drought) and reduced photosynthetic supply of substrates for isoprenoid synthesis. They emphasize that future focus should be put on emission composition shifts that are part of a plastic response to increasing abiotic stress (e.g. heat and drought) and reduced photosynthetic supply of substrates for isoprenoid synthesis.

Read whole open access paper in our scientific journal Plant Biology (2022) 24, 721-. DOI: 10.1111/plb.13419

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

21. Jun 2022 · Plant Biology · DBG

Review: Likely roles of the distinct cytosol- and plastidlocated Glutamine synthetase isoenzymes in A. thaliana

Arabidopsis thaliana revels a species-specific functional redundancy of the Glutamine Synthetase gene family, having an isoenzyme compensation mechanism that prevents gene loss of function.

In their review "Glutamine synthetase: an unlikely case of functional redundancy in Arabidopsis thaliana" the authors Moreira, Coimbra and Melo integrate analyses on the likely roles of the distinct cytosol- and plastidlocated Glutamine synthetase (GS) isoenzymes in the model plant, highlighting the redundancy of the GS gene family specifically occurring in this plant. This is in contrast to GS isoenzymes that were observed in nitrogen metabolism in species like Oryza sativa and Zea mays.

Read whole paper in our scientific journal Plant Biology DOI: 10.1111/plb.13408

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

12. May 2022 · Plant Biology · DBG

Review: Hydrogen sulphide - an emerging regulator of plant defence signalling

Hydrogen sulfide enhances plant immunity against invading pathogens.

A growing body of evidence indicates potential role of H2S in plant defence, particularly against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Recent studies suggested that the gaseous signalling molecule participates in plant defence potentially by

  1. regulating glutathione metabolism,
  2. inducing expression of pathogenesis-related (PR) and other defence-related genes,
  3. modulating enzyme activity through post-translational modifications, and
  4. interacting with phytohormones such as jasmonic acid, ethylene and auxin.

The authors Choudhary, Singh, Khatri, and Gupta discuss the biosynthesis, metabolism and interaction of H2S with phytohormones, and highlight evidence gathered so far to support the emerging roles of H2S in plant defence against invading pathogens.

Read whole paper in our scientific journal Plant Biology DOI: 10.1111/plb.13376.

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

11. May 2022 · Plant Biology · DBG

Review: How H2S mitigates adverse effects of abiotic stress

Application of exogenous hydrogen sulfide induces changes, at the biochemical and molecular level, that mitigate the detrimental effects of diverse abiotic stressors.

Since signalling molecules like hydrogen sulfide (H2S) play a crucial role in mitigating the adverse effects of environmental stresses in plants it is important to understand the several physiological and biochemical mechanisms. The authors review recent advances in understanding the beneficial roles of H2S in conferring multiple abiotic stress tolerance in plants. And discuss the interaction and crosstalk between H2S and other signal molecules and highlight some genetic engineering-based current and future directions.

Read whole paper in our scientific journal Plant Biology DOI: 10.1111/plb.13368

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

10. May 2022 · Plant Biology · DBG

Review: How H2S and NO crosstalk during waterlogging stress in legume crops

Hydrogen sulfide and Nitric oxide modulate the key traits, which are responsible for waterlogging tolerance in legumes

In their review the authors Tyagi, Sharma, Ali, and Gaikwad summarize the crosstalk of the important plant signalling molecules hydrogen sulphide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO) during waterlogging stress in legumes, which are emitted from plants and soil microbes and that are known to regulate key physiological pathways. They provide an overall summary on H2S and NO, including biosynthesis, biological importance, crosstalk, transporter regulation as well as understanding their role during waterlogging using ‘multi-omics’ approach.

Read whole paper in our scientific journal Plant Biology DOI: 10.1111/plb.13319

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

28. Mar 2022 · Plant Biology · DBG

Seed biologists beware: Estimates of initial viability based on ungerminated seeds at the end of an experiment may be error-prone

It is recommended to determine initial seed viability at the start of the experiment, since prolonged duration of ungerminated seeds in germination treatments can lead to loss of viability.

In his viewpoint paper Author Lamont asks for caution against the routine use of end-of-trial germination and viability of ungerminated seeds as an estimate of initial viability in determining germination success of various treatments. He analyses Leucadendron species and in his paper also explores ways to deal with the problem and to preference estimates of initial viability to be undertaken on a separate sample of seeds concurrently with the experiment as this avoids the risk of seed death during the trial.

Read whole paper in our scientific journal Plant Biology (2022) DOI: 10.1111/plb.13407

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

25. Mar 2022 · Plant Biology · DBG

Review: Expression and roles of GRAS gene family in plant growth, signal transduction, biotic and abiotic stress resistance and symbiosis formation

The GRAS gene family plays an important role in plant signaling, arbuscular mycorrhizal association as well as biotic and abiotic stress tolerance during various stage of plant growth and development.

In their review, the authors Khan, Xiong, Zhang, Liu, Yaseen und Hui highlight the diverse roles of GRAS in plant systems that could be useful in enhancing crop productivity through genetic modification, especially of crops. It is the first review to report the role and function of the GRAS gene family in plant systems.

Read whole paper in our scientific journal Plant Biology (2021) DOI: 10.1111/plb.13364

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

24. Mar 2022 · Plant Biology · DBG

Does plant leaf flammability converge with increasing radiant heat flux in Australian fire-prone woodlands?

Leaf flammability patterns are significantly affected by increasing radiant heat flux, with important implications for integrating leaf flammability into wildfire models.

From their findings the authors Krix, Murray and Murray conclude that leaf flammability is significantly affected by increasing radiant heat flux. In their paper “Increasing radiant heat flux affects leaf flammability patterns in plant species of eastern Australian fire-prone woodlands” they suggest that of the flammability attributes assessed, flame duration is the most informative to include in wildfire models which explicitly consider species’ flammability, given that differences among species in flame duration are maintained across a radiant heat flux gradient.

Read whole paper in our scientific journal Plant Biology 24 (2022) 302–312. DOI: 10.1111/plb.13381

(DBG's members are able to access all Plant Biology papers via our intranet).

05. Oct 2022 · Plant Biology

Our new Viewpoint Editor

Professor Rob Roelfsema (Würzburg) now is the Viewpoint Editor at our journal Plant Biology. He is looking forward to your viewpoints, short papers of approximately three published pages, with one or two figures with the following topics:

  • New insights in a hot topic in plant biology
  • Critical examination of known methods and approaches
  • New emerging techniques
  • Novel conceptual ideas or approaches in developing fields

Feel free to contact him at Würzburg University, if you have any questions. Please note that scientists in Germany and several other European countries can publish open access in Plant Biology without costs (https://deal-operations.de/en/here-is-the-deal) and please contact your library if these conditions apply to your Institution.

20. Jan 2021 · Actualia (engl.)

Journal Plant Biology: new editor-in-chief, reviews and Open Access

Prof. Dr. Christiane Werner is the new Editor-in-chief of our journal. Photo: private

Starting this year, Prof. Dr. Christiane Werner, Chair of Ecosystem Physiology at Freiburg University, Germany, has taken the new editor-in-chief position of our scientific journal Plant Biology. Werner was Co-Editor of the journal for several years and has established new ideas together with her predecessor, Prof. Dr. Heinz Rennenberg (Freiburg University), to advance the journal: The new research reviews, for example, are a good possibility for PostDocs and early career researchers to promote their field of research and become more visible in the plant science community. Contact person for reviews is Dr. Susann Wicke (HU Berlin). Werner is pleased that, thanks to Rennenberg's outstanding work, she will be able to continue a well-established journal whose impact factor Rennenberg nearly doubled in the 17 years of his editorial leadership. Plant Biology receives around 800 papers each year. Together with her diverse editorial board, the new leader hopes to implement other measures to increase the journal's visibility, such as more Special Issues or notices on Twitter and other social media. Werner is looking forward to receiving research articles as well as opinion pieces on plant research, which can be published Open Access thanks to the so-called DEAL contract, provided that the first author comes from a German scientific institution. Werner is supported by Annette Schlierenkamp in the Freiburg editorial office.

To Plant Biology’s website

Follow link
DBG

About DBG's scientific journal

Plant Biology is an international journal of broad scope bringing together the different subdisciplines, such as physiology, molecular biology, cell biology, development, genetics, systematics, ecology, evolution, ecophysiology, plant-microbe interactions, and mycology. The Journal Plant Biology is published by the German Botanical Society and the Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands. Editors are Prof. Dr. Christiane Werner (Freiburg) and Prof. J.T.M. Elzenga (Groningen).

Papers, Reviews, Topics and Theses

In Plant Biology scientists publish original research papers or write reviews. Discussion of hot topics and provocative opinion articles are published under the heading "Acute Views". The papers are peer-reviewed by independent scientists. 

How to publish Open Access for free

Members of German academic institutions can publish plant science results in our journal Plant Biology open access for free (due to the DEAL-Agreement https://www.projekt-deal.de/about-deal/).

Impact

Plant Biology’s Impact Factor has now reached 3.87, which is a strong increase on 2020 (3.08 in 2020, Source: Journal Citation Reports, Clarivate Analytics). Plant Biology is now ranked 58/239 in the Plant Science Category, which is the top quartile.

History

Starting in January 2008 the journal will be published every second month by Wiley-Blackwell. The journal is the successor of the "Berichte der Deutschen Botanischen Gesellschaft", published by the DBG from 1882-1987, followed by "Botanica Acta", published by the DBG from 1988 - 1998.

In the years 1999-2007 the journal was published in the Thieme publishing house. Since January 2008 the society's journal is published at Wiley-Blackwell.

Access

Members of the DBG are able to access the journal freely via the Intranet

Volumes and issues are also accessible behind a paywall on the Publishers Website.

> Privacy Policy of the journal Plant Biology (GDPR)